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Personal Lists featuring...

Enemy 2014

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After combing through movie lists from IMDB to Reddit, I think I've created the most complete collection of horror movies that climb inside your skull and mess with your brains.

'Beginner's Guide: Psychological Horror' http://tinyurl.com/j2ygg5w

'What Exactly Is a "Psychological" Horror Film?' http://tinyurl.com/jlp59ue

'Why We Crave Horror Movies' by Stephen King http://tinyurl.com/pm5amx5

'Common Themes in Psychological Thrillers' http://tinyurl.com/hqgtwu5

'Psychological Horror in the Films of David Lynch' http://tinyurl.com/glgmpym

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Every year there are a huge number of movies that fly right under the radar of the average movie fan. movies that are great but just not that well known.

There are plenty of movie gems out there and hopefully this list will help you find some.

Feel free to submit new movies in the comments below.

This list contains movies/documentaries and short films. The list was originally created on IMDb. http://goo.gl/gHles

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Great films with poignant, memorable, Shyamalanesque, or downright traumatic endings.

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Dennis Villinueve directed feature films

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These films are heavily influenced by Hitchcock, whether they wear that influence on their sleeves or relegate it to the subtext.

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Movies that the company A24 has produced.

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Collection of psychological thrillers, avoiding too many horror and sci-fi crossovers.

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You know? When the movie is... "sorta" indie? (Includes real indie films).

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Throughout 2014, members of Indiewire's Criticwire Network -- comprised of nearly 500 critics from around the world -- have been adding their grades and reviews to our database of film pages. Below is a collection of those films released in theaters during that time that have a) received 15 or more reviews and b) maintained a grade average of "B+" or higher.

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Last year, we claimed that our favorite films were characterized by a “triumph of the real.” Man, we’re fickle. This year, as far as reality went, we just couldn’t even. Instead of 2013’s actual people, our favorite characters were children’s toys (The LEGO Movie), superheros (Birdman), aliens (Guardians of the Galaxy), and vampires (Only Lovers Left Alive). Instead of 2013’s refigured documentary techniques, it was the pulpy remnants of genre filmmaking — both in style and subject matter — that dripped down our list, starting with our honorable mentions (The Guest, The Rover, The One I Love) and ending in a pitch-black puddle at our #1.

Our interests in genre filmmaking and the imaginary were hardly escapist. Eye-searing violence — whether instrumental (Blue Ruin, Borgman) or for its own sake (The Raid 2, Why Don’t You Play in Hell?) — was inescapable. Sex was nearly always linked with death (Stranger by the Lake, Under the Skin, Gone Girl), torture (Thou Wast Mild and Lovely), or at least suspicion (Nymphomaniac) and blackmail (Nightcrawler). As Wes Anderson toyed with dismemberment and murder (Grand Budapest Hotel), and romcoms revolved around shmashmortion (Obvious Child), even the usual go-to filmic safehouses were markedly macabre. (Let’s not even mention honorable mention Moebius.)

Even when we were waist-deep in filmic blood and sad cum, though, it was impossible to read all this bodily fluid as any kind of grand narrative. Taken as a whole, our favorite films of 2014 offered more counter- and micro-narratives than anything else. Two genuine Hollywood blockbusters adapted childhood (Lego) and adolescent (Guardians of the Galaxy) brand names so delightfully that even our cynical, cold, Bela Tarr- and Harmony Korine-filled hearts opened up to them. But even though Hollywood seemed to have finally gotten its shit together, two newer indie distributors — A24 and Drafthouse Films — were already leaving it in the dust, together releasing a whopping one-fifth of our favorite films, including our #1.

Turning from industry to auteurs, middle-aged and just plain-aged masters made career-defining works that compounded their stylistic idiosyncrasies in ambitious, sometimes divisive ways: Sion Sono and Jean-Luc Godard interrogated their filmic careers through experimentation in new (for them) ways of filming — 35mm and 3D, respectively — while Richard Linklater and Alejandro Jodorowsky each attempted to account for the passage of time in some of the most compelling quasi-autobiographical works yet made. Along the same lines, Alex Ross Perry, an up-and-coming NYC director, dared us to read autobiography into his film about an up-and-coming NYC novelist/endearingly pretentious jerkwad. (So much for everything I just said about “the real” not making much of an impact in 2014.) Meanwhile, Josephine Decker, a young woman we had only admired as an actress, gifted us a two-film directorial debut that challenged aesthetic and narrative limits more successfully than most directors do in a lifetime.

The takeaway, if anything, is that it was a great year to watch movies, whether at the multiplex, the arthouse, or some newfangled VOD platform. We couldn’t even fit all of our favorites on this list, so read the names of these honorable mentions before moving onto our blurbage: A Field in England, The Rover, A Most Violent Year, Tatuagem, Manakamana, The Guest, Ida, White Bird in a Blizzard, Two Days One Night, Vic + Flo Saw a Bear, Art and Craft, The Last of the Unjust, Citizenfour, A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, The One I Love. –BENJAMIN PEARSON"

Source: http://www.tinymixtapes.com/features/2014-favorite-30-films-of-2014

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New to Amazon Prime Instant Video during the month of August 2014.

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