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Leave Her to Heaven 1945

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248

Since 1984, the Criterion Collection, has been dedicated to gathering the greatest films from around the world and publishing them in editions that offer the highest technical quality and award-winning, original supplements for a wider and wider audience. The foundation of the collection is the work of such masters of cinema as Kurosawa, Fellini, Bergman, Tarkovsky, Hitchcock, and Kubrick. Each film is presented uncut, in its original aspect ratio, as its maker intended it to be seen. To date, more than 150 filmmakers have made it into the collection.

Source: https://www.criterion.com/library/list_view?b=Criterion&m=dvd&s=spine

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In its first film season, 1927–28, this award (like others such as the acting awards) was not tied to a specific film; all of the work by the nominated cinematographers during the qualifying period was listed after their names. The problem with this system became obvious the first year, since Karl Struss and Charles Rosher were nominated for their work together on Sunrise but three other films shot individually by either Rosher or Struss were also listed as part of the nomination. The second year, 1929, there were no nominations at all, although the Academy has a list of unofficial titles which were under consideration by the Board of Judges. In the third year, 1930, films, not cinematographers, were nominated, and the final award did not show the cinematographer's name.

Finally, for the 1931 awards, the modern system in which individuals are nominated for a single film each was adopted in all profession-related categories. From 1939 to 1967 with the exception of 1957, there were also separate awards for color and for black-and-white cinematography. Since then, the only black-and-white film to win is Schindler's List (1993).

Floyd Crosby won the award for Tabu in 1931, which was the last silent film to win in this category. Hal Mohr won the only write-in Academy Award ever, in 1935 for A Midsummer Night's Dream. Mohr was also the first person to win for both black-and-white and color cinematography.

No winners are lost, although some of the earliest nominees (and of the unofficial nominees of 1928–29) are lost, including The Devil Dancer (1927), The Magic Flame (1927), and Four Devils (1928). The Right to Love (1930) is incomplete, and Sadie Thompson (1927) is incomplete and partially reconstructed with stills.

The first nominees shot primarily on digital video were The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and Slumdog Millionaire in 2009, with Slumdog Millionaire the first winner.[1] The following year Avatar was the first nominee and winner to be shot entirely on digital video.[2]

In 2018, Rachel Morrison became the first woman to receive a nomination. Prior to that it had been the last Academy Award category to never nominate a woman.[3][4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academy_Award_for_Best_Cinematography#Winners_and_nominees

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The 500 movies in this list have been selected by a combination of 10,000 Empire readers, 50 critics and 150 of Hollywood's finest.

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The 2013 edition can be found at http://trakt.tv/user/sp1ti/lists/they-shoot-pictures-dont-they-1000-greatest-films-2013.

Welcome to 2012's edition of the 1,000 Greatest Films. This will be the last update prior to the publication of the 'earth-shattering' Sight & Sound poll which will be unfurled later in the year. The Sight & Sound results will no doubt have a major impact on TSPDT's 1,000 Greatest Films listing. It will become the most heavily weighted poll within our calculations. Anyway, that is then, and this is now."

Source: http://www.theyshootpictures.com/gf1000.htm

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A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese Through American Movies is a documentary film of 225 minutes in length, presented by Martin Scorsese and produced by the British Film Institute.
In the film Martin Scorsese examines a selection of his favorite American films grouped according to three different types of directors: the director as an illusionist: D.W. Griffith or F. W. Murnau, who created new editing techniques among other innovations that made the appearance of sound and color possible later on, the director as a smuggler - filmmakers such as Douglas Sirk, Samuel Fuller, and Vincente Minnelli, who used to hide subversive messages in their films and the director as an iconoclast, those filmmakers attacking social conventionalism — Charles Chaplin, Erich von Stroheim, Orson Welles, Elia Kazan, Nicholas Ray, Stanley Kubrick, Arthur Penn, and Sam Peckinpah."

The list includes the films mentioned in order of appearance. The documentary can be found here https://trakt.tv/movies/a-personal-journey-with-martin-scorsese-through-american-movies-1995.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Personal_Journey_with_Martin_Scorsese_Through_American_Movies

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List of movies that won the Academy Award for Best Cinematography from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

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159

Deciding that Londoners should have the opportunity to view a film masterpiece approximately every day during the course of the year, BFI film archivist David Meeker approached the board of directors at the BFI in 1982 with his idea of compiling a list of 360 of the world’s cinema masterpieces, collect brand new, state-of-the-art prints of each film and issue a companion book for each movie. This list of films, referred to as the 360 Classic Feature Films project, was published in Sight and Sound's June 1998 issue.

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The National Film Registry is the United States National Film Preservation Board's selection of films for preservation in the Library of Congress. The Board was established in 1988. Each year, 25 "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant films" are preserved, to increase awareness for its preservation. To be eligible for inclusion, a film must be at least ten years old but it is not required to be feature-length, nor is it required to have been theatrically released.

Source: https://www.loc.gov/programs/national-film-preservation-board/film-registry/complete-national-film-registry-listing/

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A personal introduction to 1000 movies by the provocative contemporary film critic and historian David Thomson.

Source: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Have-You-Seen-Introduction-masterpieces/dp/014102075X

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This list contains all movies that have won the Best Cinematography prize in the Academy Awards.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academy_Award_for_Best_Cinematography

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From one of the world's most acclaimed directors comes an absorbing and informative look at the evolution of American film and how the medium both shaped Scorsese's own artistic vision and influenced the whole of American culture. Hundreds of film stills, many in color, plus dialogue, quotations, and other sources add to and illustrate each chapter's overriding theme.

List is of all works with cited clips, in order of first appearance.
Part 1: 1-40
Part 2: 41-74
Part 3: 75-99

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The best movies of the 1940's decade.

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7.0 or higher rating
5,000 or more votes

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A list of the 100 Greatest Films Noir compiled by Digital Dream Door. These Greatest 'Film Noir' Movies were chosen for their direction, acting, storyline, cinematography, box office success and popularity. These films were NOT chosen for how highly rated they are overall, but how they rate in the subject of "Film Noir Movies".

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Best Film Releases of the 40s

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Film noir is a cinematic term used primarily to describe stylish Hollywood crime dramas, particularly those that emphasize cynical attitudes and sexual motivations. The 1940s and 1950s are generally regarded as the "classic period" of American film noir. Film noir of this era is associated with a low-key, black-and-white visual style that has roots in German Expressionist cinematography. Many of the prototypical stories and much of the attitude of classic noir derive from the hardboiled school of crime fiction that emerged in the United States during the Great Depression. Film noir encompasses a range of plots: the central figure may be a private investigator (The Big Sleep), a plainclothes policeman (The Big Heat), an aging boxer (The Set-Up), a hapless grifter (Night and the City), a law-abiding citizen lured into a life of crime (Gun Crazy), or simply a victim of circumstance (D.O.A.). Although film noir was originally associated with American productions, the term has been used to describe films from around the world. Many films released from the 1960s onward share attributes with film noirs of the classical period, and often treat its conventions self-referentially. Some refer to such latter-day works as neo-noir.

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IMDB's 75 Most Popular Film Noir Feature Films as of 1/13/18, plus some that were previously in the top 50 (http://www.imdb.com/search/title?genres=film_noir&title_type=feature&sort=moviemeter,asc)

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