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Personal Lists featuring...

Night of the Bloody Apes 1969

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Prior to the establishment of UK state censorship implemented in the Video Recordings Act of 1984, censorship was in the realms of the courts and the Obscene Publications Act. This required the courts to apply the test of whether videos were likely to "deprave and corrupt" the viewer. The Director Of Public Prosecutions (DPP) maintained a list of those videos that were felt likely to be found obscene by the courts and hence worthwhile prosecuting.
Of course, the real drivers behind the moral panic were the UK press led by the ever obnoxious Daily Mail. Not to mention a few politicians who felt they could make a name for themselves.

Several versions of the video nasty list were published with videos added and removed over the period 1983-1985. 72 videos were listed at least for a while. Another couple of films can stake a claim via a shared name with listed films. 39 made it through to the end, and these became known as the DPP39s. These 39 titles became the most sought after collectibles.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_nasty

To get you into the right mindset just watch http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UzolFFd9NcU

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"To assist local authorities in identifying obscene films, the Director of Public Prosecutions released a list of 72 films the office believed to violate the Obscene Publications Act 1959."

Source:
http://bloody-disgusting.com/editorials/3476400/breaking-72-video-nasties/

More info:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_nasty

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The complete banned videos nasties list.

Prior to the establishment of UK state censorship implemented in the Video Recordings Act of 1984, censorship was in the realms of the courts and the Obscene Publications Act. This required the courts to apply the test of whether videos were likely to "deprave and corrupt" the viewer. The Director Of Public Prosecutions (DPP) maintained a list of those videos that were felt likely to be found obscene by the courts and hence worthwhile prosecuting.

Of course, the real drivers behind the moral panic were the UK press led by the ever obnoxious Daily Mail. Not to mention a few politicians who felt they could make a name for themselves.

Several versions of the video nasty list were published with videos added and removed over the period 1983-1985. 72 videos were listed at least for a while. Another couple of films can stake a claim via a shared name with listed films. 39 made it through to the end, and these became known as the DPP39s. These 39 titles became the most sought after collectibles.

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The DPP list of 'video nasties' was first made public in June 1983. The list was modified monthly as prosecutions failed or were dropped. In total, 72 separate films appeared on the list at one time or another. 39 films were successfully prosecuted under the Obscene Publications Act but some of these films have been subsequently cut and then approved for release by the BBFC. The remaining 33 were either not prosecuted or had unsuccessful prosecutions. 10 films remain banned in the UK because they have not yet been resubmitted for classification by any distributors or have been rejected for classification.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_nasty

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Prior to the establishment of UK state censorship implemented in the Video Recordings Act of 1984, censorship was in the realms of the courts and the Obscene Publications Act. This required the courts to apply the test of whether videos were likely to "deprave and corrupt" the viewer. The Director Of Public Prosecutions (DPP) maintained a list of those videos that were felt likely to be found obscene by the courts and hence worthwhile prosecuting.
Of course, the real drivers behind the moral panic were the UK press led by the ever obnoxious Daily Mail. Not to mention a few politicians who felt they could make a name for themselves.

Several versions of the video nasty list were published with videos added and removed over the period 1983-1985. 72 videos were listed at least for a while. Another couple of films can stake a claim via a shared name with listed films. 39 made it through to the end, and these became known as the DPP39s. These 39 titles became the most sought after collectibles.

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Monkey related movies. Horror ones are prefered

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Video nasty is a colloquial term in the United Kingdom to refer to a number of films distributed on video cassette that were criticised for their violent content by the press, social commentators and various religious organizations. The term was popularised by the National Viewers' and Listeners' Association (NVALA) in the UK in the early 1980s.

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