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Personal Lists featuring...

Shanghai Express 1932

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1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die is a film reference book edited by Steven Jay Schneider with original essays on each film contributed by over 70 film critics.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1001_Movies_You_Must_See_Before_You_Die

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In its first film season, 1927–28, this award (like others such as the acting awards) was not tied to a specific film; all of the work by the nominated cinematographers during the qualifying period was listed after their names. The problem with this system became obvious the first year, since Karl Struss and Charles Rosher were nominated for their work together on Sunrise but three other films shot individually by either Rosher or Struss were also listed as part of the nomination. The second year, 1929, there were no nominations at all, although the Academy has a list of unofficial titles which were under consideration by the Board of Judges. In the third year, 1930, films, not cinematographers, were nominated, and the final award did not show the cinematographer's name.

Finally, for the 1931 awards, the modern system in which individuals are nominated for a single film each was adopted in all profession-related categories. From 1939 to 1967 with the exception of 1957, there were also separate awards for color and for black-and-white cinematography. Since then, the only black-and-white film to win is Schindler's List (1993).

Floyd Crosby won the award for Tabu in 1931, which was the last silent film to win in this category. Hal Mohr won the only write-in Academy Award ever, in 1935 for A Midsummer Night's Dream. Mohr was also the first person to win for both black-and-white and color cinematography.

No winners are lost, although some of the earliest nominees (and of the unofficial nominees of 1928–29) are lost, including The Devil Dancer (1927), The Magic Flame (1927), and Four Devils (1928). The Right to Love (1930) is incomplete, and Sadie Thompson (1927) is incomplete and partially reconstructed with stills.

The first nominees shot primarily on digital video were The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and Slumdog Millionaire in 2009, with Slumdog Millionaire the first winner.[1] The following year Avatar was the first nominee and winner to be shot entirely on digital video.[2]

In 2018, Rachel Morrison became the first woman to receive a nomination. Prior to that it had been the last Academy Award category to never nominate a woman.[3][4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academy_Award_for_Best_Cinematography#Winners_and_nominees

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Original Edition (2003) + additions (2004-2018) in that order.
Based on http://1001films.wikia.com/wiki/The_List

2018 Edition Additions:
- The Handmaiden (2016)
- Dawson City: Frozen Time (2016)
- Lady Macbeth (2016)
- Lady Bird (2017)
- The Shape of Water (2017)
- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (2017)
- Call Me by Your Name (2017)
- Mother! (2017)
- Blade Runner 2049 (2017)
- Get Out (2017)
- Black Panther (2018)

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TSPDT's The 1,000 Greatest Films
13th Edition (January 2018)

List curated by Bill Georgaris on They Shoot Pictures, Don't They?

Notes: Olympia (#750/751) is a single entry on TSPDT, but as two entries on Trakt.

Source: https://www.theyshootpictures.com/gf1000.htm

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They Shoot Pictures, Don't They? (TSPDT) is a modest but growing film resource dedicated to the art of motion picture filmmaking and most specifically to that one particular individual calling the shots from behind the camera - the film director.

This list is based on TSPDT's 1,000 Greatest Films, a list compilated by Bill Georgaris using thousands of best-of/all-time lists.

www.theyshootpictures.com

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In his Guide for the Film Fanatic (1986), Danny Peary provides short reviews for over 1600 “Must See” films.

104 movies missing. Imported from external source.

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The 2013 version of TSPDT’s 1,000 Greatest Films is finally here. After months of stop-start, data-building and unhealthy calculation antics, the latest group of 1,000 movie offerings has been assembled once again for your pleasure (or displeasure). Depending on your observation skills, you may have already noticed that there is a new presentation for this ongoing project.

Source: http://www.theyshootpictures.com/gf1000.htm

The old 2012 edition can be found @http://trakt.tv/users/sp1ti/lists/they-shoot-pictures-dont-they-1000-greatest-films-2012

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This is a list of the films featured in The Story of Film: An Odyssey series by Mark Cousins.

The films are in order of appearance in the series.
The following are missing (not in Trakt):

  • American Cinema: Film Noir - Alain Klarer (1995)
  • 71st Academy Awards - Louis J. Horvitz (1999)
  • Andrei Tarkovsky & Sergei Parajanov – Islands - Levon Grigoryan (1988)
  • Sinemaabi: A Dialogue with Djibril Diop Mambéty - Beti Ellerson Poulenc (1997)
  • Motion Capture Mirrors Emotion - Jorge Ribas (2009)

Source:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Story_of_Film:_An_Odyssey

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Best Film Releases of the 30s

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I've got the 10th edition of the German translation of "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die". It's a 960-paged book edited by Steven Jay Schneider, containing the combined knowledge of 77 internationally renowned movie ciritics, with short one to half-sided essays, movie credits, and trivia, throughout all genres and countries.

There are already a number of lists out, however, this book is reviewed every year, and as far as I can tell (I did go through a lot of these lists) non depicts the 2013 edition I possess, which ends with Life of Pi. I then thought of the ideal list being on that includes all movies, starting from the original list from 2003, with all the editions but non of the removals since then. Thanks to the internet, such list exists and therefore I will be adding these here, one by one. I did not "rank" them, because actually the book doesn't either - they are ordered by year and that is as meaningful as any other order I guess. Also, the "ranked lists" all have the problem that some movies are removed, which is why a number of people think about how to renumber this list probably... all things I deem unnecessary.

And yes, I intend to watch them all! If you watch one of them every week, it's just a 20 years task :D

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1001_Movies_You_Must_See_Before_You_Die

http://1001films.wikia.com/wiki/The_List

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From latest edition. 2017th edition will be published in October 2017.

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This is a complete list of every movie that has ever been included in the various editions of 1001 movies. Given that I only own one edition of the physical book, this is a easier way to keep track of what has been (once) considered essential viewing.

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"1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die" is a film reference book edited by Steven Jay Schneider with original essays on each film contributed by over 70 film critics. This list holds the 1001 movies that are referenced in the only Danish edition from 2007.

My goal is to watch all 1001 before I die :) I have currently watched 367... Still quite a long way.

The list is originated from the work of sp1ti and his list here: http://trakt.tv/user/sp1ti/lists/1001-movies-you-must-see-before-you-die

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The 2013 edition can be found at http://trakt.tv/user/sp1ti/lists/they-shoot-pictures-dont-they-1000-greatest-films-2013.

Welcome to 2012's edition of the 1,000 Greatest Films. This will be the last update prior to the publication of the 'earth-shattering' Sight & Sound poll which will be unfurled later in the year. The Sight & Sound results will no doubt have a major impact on TSPDT's 1,000 Greatest Films listing. It will become the most heavily weighted poll within our calculations. Anyway, that is then, and this is now."

Source: http://www.theyshootpictures.com/gf1000.htm

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In his Guide for the Film Fanatic (1986), Danny Peary provides short reviews for over 1600 “Must See” films.

104 movies missing. Imported from external source.

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