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Personal Lists featuring...

The Brood 1979

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Created by Edgar Wright on October 2017. Source: https://mubi.com/lists/edgar-wright-s-100-favourite-horror-movies

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The Criterion Collection is a video distribution company which specializes in licensing and selling "important classic and contemporary films" in "editions that offer the highest technical quality and award-winning, original supplements."

This is a list of all films (main feature, extra featurette, making of, box-set meta entry, etc if it has a separate entry on trakt) released under Criterion Collection catalog, Essential Art House, Eclipse, Merchant Ivory collections etc. as DVD/BluRay. So far LaserDisc releases have not been included.

Notes to self:
Reviewed/cross-checked entries till Criterion Collection #200.
Last entry: Criterion Collection Spine #845 / Eclipse Series #44.

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Stephen King is the master of horror, but what scares him? According to the many recommendations from his legendary book “Danse Macabre” and various tweets in recent years, a fascinating cross-section of scary movies gets his pulse racing. Check out all of his favorites and get ready to catch a fright.

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The 100 Scariest Movie Moments is an American television documentary miniseries that aired in late October 2004 on Bravo. Aired in five 60-minute segments, the miniseries counts down what producer Anthony Timpone, writer Patrick Moses, and director Kevin Kaufman have determined as the 100 most frightening and disturbing moments in the history of movies.

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The best and your favorites from the 1970s

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Favorite and noteworthy horror films

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In his Guide for the Film Fanatic (1986), Danny Peary provides short reviews for over 1600 “Must See” films.

104 movies missing. Imported from external source.

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Source: IMDB
Filter: Votes >= 10000
Order: Votes Descending
Date: 2014-08-23

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http://www.top10films.co.uk/archives/21468

One of the best novels I have ever read is Stephen King’s “It”. The epic fantasy-horror spans decades but its core story takes place in two time periods separated by 30 years. In the novel’s early part, a group of children band together to battle a monster terrorising their town. As social outcasts to varying degrees, they are brought together by their collective insecurities and pubescent anxieties, as well as their individual experiences of “It” and as King would have us believe a force of “good” that counters the pervading force of “evil”, to fight the “beast” and save themselves and their town.

A group of young teenagers go to battle with Stephen King's monstrous child killer Pennywise in Tommy Lee Wallace's "It".
A group of young teenagers go to battle with Stephen King’s monstrous child killer Pennywise in Tommy Lee Wallace’s “It”.
As children in the 1960s they enter the sewers underneath their town to find the monster’s lair. Armed with one of their mother’s silver earrings (their “silver bullets”) and a slingshot, the group find the monster in its guise as Pennywise the Clown and shoot it. They cries out in pain and disappears down a drain. They believe they’ve killed it but just to be sure, based on its thirty-year killing cycles, they agree that if it returns, they will regroup and battle it again. When mysterious murders start up three decades later, the group, each of its members gone their separate ways and living in different parts of the country, come back together to make good on their promise as children.
It’s a wonderful story with childhood friendship at its heart and one of the great fictional villains. The film version – a made-for-TV two-part mini-series – works quite well at times but is far better when it concentrates on the characters as children, as opposed to their adult counterparts. I’m definitely fond of the film adaptation but as cinematic depictions of King’s work go it ranks well below the likes of The Shining, Misery and Carrie. However, it is a perfect example of how children have played an important role in films (or works of popular fiction like King’s novel) made primarily for adults. And the horror genre has produced some of the finest…

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Neuchâtel International Fantastic Film Festival lineup for 2013.

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In his Guide for the Film Fanatic (1986), Danny Peary provides short reviews for over 1600 “Must See” films.

104 movies missing. Imported from external source.

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https://mubi.com/lists/edgar-wright-s-100-favourite-horror-movies

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According to IndieWire article.
P.s: I couldn't find "I Bury the Living" on Trakt.tv

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Partial list of media on physical disc.

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