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Personal Lists featuring...

The Flowers of St. Francis 1950

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The Criterion Collection is a video distribution company which specializes in licensing and selling "important classic and contemporary films" in "editions that offer the highest technical quality and award-winning, original supplements."

This is a list of all films (main feature, extra featurette, making of, box-set meta entry, etc if it has a separate entry on trakt) released under Criterion Collection catalog, Essential Art House, Eclipse, Merchant Ivory collections etc. as DVD/BluRay. So far LaserDisc releases have not been included.

Notes to self:
Reviewed/cross-checked entries till Criterion Collection #200.
Last entry: Criterion Collection Spine #845 / Eclipse Series #44.

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TSPDT's The 1,000 Greatest Films
13th Edition (January 2018)

List curated by Bill Georgaris on They Shoot Pictures, Don't They?

Notes: Olympia (#750/751) is a single entry on TSPDT, but as two entries on Trakt.

Source: https://www.theyshootpictures.com/gf1000.htm

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They Shoot Pictures, Don't They? (TSPDT) is a modest but growing film resource dedicated to the art of motion picture filmmaking and most specifically to that one particular individual calling the shots from behind the camera - the film director.

This list is based on TSPDT's 1,000 Greatest Films, a list compilated by Bill Georgaris using thousands of best-of/all-time lists.

www.theyshootpictures.com

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In response to the American Film Institute’s list of the 100 greatest American movies, film scholar Jonathan Rosenbaum took the AFI to task for what he saw as a product "symptomatic of an increasingly dumbed-down film culture that continues to outflank our shrinking expectations." Of course, any list of this kind (including Sight and Sound’s decennial roster and the Village Voice Film Critic’s Poll from a few years back) is not without its blind spots. Participants are often forced to pick a select group of favorites and make a number of concessions ("Well, if I want Antonioni to make it into the collective top 10, I’d better hedge my bets with L’Avventura instead of my personal favorite Zabriskie Point."). Consequently, underdogs and obscure gems have little chance of being represented on a composite list that’s typically unveiled with little-to-no "justification for any of its titles" (to borrow again from Rosenbaum). Rather than present a list that looks like everyone else’s, Slant Magazine has decided to do something a little different. While you will find many popular classics and critical favorites on our list of 100 Essential Films, our goal was to mix things up a bit. This list should not be construed as a definitive "greatest films" package, but as an alternative compiled by a group of kinky film-lovers wanting to give serious critical thought to neglected, forgotten and misunderstood gems. We aimed for the kind of list where post-Cahiers Orson Welles could stand shoulder-to-shoulder with a pre-pastiche Brian De Palma; where it’s understood that Hitchcock, Dreyer, Ford, and Ozu created masterpieces besides film school staples like Vertigo, The Passion of Joan of Arc, The Searchers, and Tokyo Story; and where the postmodern irony of Douglas Sirk’s Imitation of Life is allowed space next to its modern-day equivalent: Paul Verhoeven’s Showgirls (gasp!). Because space was tight, documentaries, shorts and animated films were not eligible. Additionally, we limited directors to no more than one spot on the list.

Source: http://www.slantmagazine.com/features/article/100-essential-films

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Cahiers du Cinéma, (Notebooks on Cinema) is a French film magazine founded in 1951.
Top 10 films chosen annually by the critics of Cahiers du Cinéma

The history of the Cahiers is related to the Cinéma history, in particular because of a generation of enthusiasts who gave birth to the Nouvelle Vague. Jean-Luc Godard, François Truffaut, Éric Rohmer, Jacques Rivette, Claude Chabrol and many others wrote their first reviews before becoming filmmakers.

Sources:
https://www.cahiersducinema.com/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cahiers_du_cinéma

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In response to the American Film Institute’s list of the 100 greatest American movies, film scholar Jonathan Rosenbaum took the AFI to task for what he saw as a product "symptomatic of an increasingly dumbed-down film culture that continues to outflank our shrinking expectations." Of course, any list of this kind (including Sight and Sound’s decennial roster and the Village Voice Film Critic’s Poll from a few years back) is not without its blind spots. Participants are often forced to pick a select group of favorites and make a number of concessions ("Well, if I want Antonioni to make it into the collective top 10, I’d better hedge my bets with L’Avventura instead of my personal favorite Zabriskie Point."). Consequently, underdogs and obscure gems have little chance of being represented on a composite list that’s typically unveiled with little-to-no "justification for any of its titles" (to borrow again from Rosenbaum). Rather than present a list that looks like everyone else’s, Slant Magazine has decided to do something a little different. While you will find many popular classics and critical favorites on our list of 100 Essential Films, our goal was to mix things up a bit. This list should not be construed as a definitive "greatest films" package, but as an alternative compiled by a group of kinky film-lovers wanting to give serious critical thought to neglected, forgotten and misunderstood gems. We aimed for the kind of list where post-Cahiers Orson Welles could stand shoulder-to-shoulder with a pre-pastiche Brian De Palma; where it’s understood that Hitchcock, Dreyer, Ford, and Ozu created masterpieces besides film school staples like Vertigo, The Passion of Joan of Arc, The Searchers, and Tokyo Story; and where the postmodern irony of Douglas Sirk’s Imitation of Life is allowed space next to its modern-day equivalent: Paul Verhoeven’s Showgirls (gasp!). Because space was tight, documentaries, shorts and animated films were not eligible. Additionally, we limited directors to no more than one spot on the list.

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The 2013 version of TSPDT’s 1,000 Greatest Films is finally here. After months of stop-start, data-building and unhealthy calculation antics, the latest group of 1,000 movie offerings has been assembled once again for your pleasure (or displeasure). Depending on your observation skills, you may have already noticed that there is a new presentation for this ongoing project.

Source: http://www.theyshootpictures.com/gf1000.htm

The old 2012 edition can be found @http://trakt.tv/users/sp1ti/lists/they-shoot-pictures-dont-they-1000-greatest-films-2012

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The 2013 edition can be found at http://trakt.tv/user/sp1ti/lists/they-shoot-pictures-dont-they-1000-greatest-films-2013.

Welcome to 2012's edition of the 1,000 Greatest Films. This will be the last update prior to the publication of the 'earth-shattering' Sight & Sound poll which will be unfurled later in the year. The Sight & Sound results will no doubt have a major impact on TSPDT's 1,000 Greatest Films listing. It will become the most heavily weighted poll within our calculations. Anyway, that is then, and this is now."

Source: http://www.theyshootpictures.com/gf1000.htm

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On the occasion of the 100th anniversary of cinema in 1995, the Vatican compiled this list of "great films."

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The 200 best movies ever created, according to the greek Cinema magazine's list published in 2008.

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