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Personal Lists featuring...

The Naked City 1948

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In its first film season, 1927–28, this award (like others such as the acting awards) was not tied to a specific film; all of the work by the nominated cinematographers during the qualifying period was listed after their names. The problem with this system became obvious the first year, since Karl Struss and Charles Rosher were nominated for their work together on Sunrise but three other films shot individually by either Rosher or Struss were also listed as part of the nomination. The second year, 1929, there were no nominations at all, although the Academy has a list of unofficial titles which were under consideration by the Board of Judges. In the third year, 1930, films, not cinematographers, were nominated, and the final award did not show the cinematographer's name.

Finally, for the 1931 awards, the modern system in which individuals are nominated for a single film each was adopted in all profession-related categories. From 1939 to 1967 with the exception of 1957, there were also separate awards for color and for black-and-white cinematography. Since then, the only black-and-white film to win is Schindler's List (1993).

Floyd Crosby won the award for Tabu in 1931, which was the last silent film to win in this category. Hal Mohr won the only write-in Academy Award ever, in 1935 for A Midsummer Night's Dream. Mohr was also the first person to win for both black-and-white and color cinematography.

No winners are lost, although some of the earliest nominees (and of the unofficial nominees of 1928–29) are lost, including The Devil Dancer (1927), The Magic Flame (1927), and Four Devils (1928). The Right to Love (1930) is incomplete, and Sadie Thompson (1927) is incomplete and partially reconstructed with stills.

The first nominees shot primarily on digital video were The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and Slumdog Millionaire in 2009, with Slumdog Millionaire the first winner.[1] The following year Avatar was the first nominee and winner to be shot entirely on digital video.[2]

In 2018, Rachel Morrison became the first woman to receive a nomination. Prior to that it had been the last Academy Award category to never nominate a woman.[3][4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academy_Award_for_Best_Cinematography#Winners_and_nominees

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The Criterion Collection is a video distribution company which specializes in licensing and selling "important classic and contemporary films" in "editions that offer the highest technical quality and award-winning, original supplements."

This is a list of all films (main feature, extra featurette, making of, box-set meta entry, etc if it has a separate entry on trakt) released under Criterion Collection catalog, Essential Art House, Eclipse, Merchant Ivory collections etc. as DVD/BluRay. So far LaserDisc releases have not been included.

Notes to self:
Reviewed/cross-checked entries till Criterion Collection #200.
Last entry: Criterion Collection Spine #845 / Eclipse Series #44.

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Since 1984, the Criterion Collection, has been dedicated to gathering the greatest films from around the world and publishing them in editions that offer the highest technical quality and award-winning, original supplements for a wider and wider audience. The foundation of the collection is the work of such masters of cinema as Kurosawa, Fellini, Bergman, Tarkovsky, Hitchcock, and Kubrick. Each film is presented uncut, in its original aspect ratio, as its maker intended it to be seen. To date, more than 150 filmmakers have made it into the collection.

Source: https://www.criterion.com/library/list_view?b=Criterion&m=dvd&s=spine

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All the winners in the Best Cinematography category of the Oscars.

List of Academy Award winners and nominees for Best Cinematography: http://bit.ly/37Jf8tg

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Since 1984, the Criterion Collection has been dedicated to publishing important classic and contemporary films from around the world in editions that offer the highest technical quality and award-winning, original supplements. No matter the medium—from laserdisc to DVD and Blu-ray to streaming—Criterion has maintained its pioneering commitment to presenting each film as its maker would want it seen, in state-of-the-art restorations with special features designed to encourage repeated watching and deepen the viewer’s appreciation of the art of film.

Films listed by spine numbers. Release with multiple films not found on Trakt are listed as individual items in this list in case CC did not release them as individual titles as well under a spine number.

Last Update: January 2020

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TSPDT is building a list of 1000 Noir films to expand on its previous 250 Quintessential Noirs. Following the initial collection of 100 noirs, a further 900 noir films (or films with prominent noir elements) will steadily be added (in a fairly random manner). This list will contain the full 1000 films which are the 1,000 most cited noir films (according to TSPDT's research). Please note that this list has not been and will not be ranked.

Source: http://www.theyshootpictures.com/noir1000.htm

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A personal introduction to 1000 movies by the provocative contemporary film critic and historian David Thomson.

Source: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Have-You-Seen-Introduction-masterpieces/dp/014102075X

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Trading on its impeccable reputation, Halliwell’s now presents it’s Top 1,000 favorite films. Starting at number 1,000, each entry includes a plot summary, cast and crew, awards, key critical comments, DVD and soundtrack availability, and a wealth of other interesting details. To supplement the countdown, there is commentary from film stars, show business personalities, well-known critics, and the movers and shakers in the film industry, each naming their favorite films or weighing in on Halliwell’s selection. Illustrated throughout with classic and modern film stills and posters, this is a book that every cinema fan will want to own. John Walker is one of Britain’s leading film critics.

The list has 42 extra films, because trilogies, or series, are counted as one entry (The Godfather, The Apu Trilogy, The Lord of the Rings, Antoine Doinel, Laurel and Hardy shorts, etc...)

Source: https://www.amazon.com/Halliwells-Top-1000-Ultimate-Countdown/dp/0007181655

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This list contains all movies that have won the Best Cinematography prize in the Academy Awards.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academy_Award_for_Best_Cinematography

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A list of the films added to the National Film Registry. Includes 2018.

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A list of the 100 Greatest Films Noir compiled by Digital Dream Door. These Greatest 'Film Noir' Movies were chosen for their direction, acting, storyline, cinematography, box office success and popularity. These films were NOT chosen for how highly rated they are overall, but how they rate in the subject of "Film Noir Movies".

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The 250 Quintessential Noir Films listing contains 241 films that all contain three key ingredients.

  1. They were all produced in the United States
  2. They were all shot in black-and-white
  3. They were all produced between 1940 to 1959.

The nine films, that have been included, that exclude at least one of these key ingredients are two Non-American-produced noir (The Third Man and Mr. Arkadin), four colour noir films (Leave Her to Heaven, Niagara, Party Girl and Slightly Scarlet), and three films from the early 1960s (Cape Fear, Underworld, U.S.A. and The Naked Kiss).

List has been curated by Bill Georgaris on They Shoot Pictures, Don't They?

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Mostly classic films from Hollywood's Golden Era, but any black & white could be on this list

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The National Film Registry is the United States National Film Preservation Board's selection of films for preservation in the Library of Congress. The Board was established in 1988. Each year, 25 "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant films" are preserved, to increase awareness for its preservation. To be eligible for inclusion, a film must be at least ten years old but it is not required to be feature-length, nor is it required to have been theatrically released.

Source: https://www.loc.gov/programs/national-film-preservation-board/film-registry/complete-national-film-registry-listing/

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