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Personal Lists featuring...

The Towering Inferno 1974

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Original Edition (2003) + additions (2004-2018) in that order.
Based on http://1001films.wikia.com/wiki/The_List

2018 Edition Additions:
- The Handmaiden (2016)
- Dawson City: Frozen Time (2016)
- Lady Macbeth (2016)
- Lady Bird (2017)
- The Shape of Water (2017)
- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (2017)
- Call Me by Your Name (2017)
- Mother! (2017)
- Blade Runner 2049 (2017)
- Get Out (2017)
- Black Panther (2018)

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In its first film season, 1927–28, this award (like others such as the acting awards) was not tied to a specific film; all of the work by the nominated cinematographers during the qualifying period was listed after their names. The problem with this system became obvious the first year, since Karl Struss and Charles Rosher were nominated for their work together on Sunrise but three other films shot individually by either Rosher or Struss were also listed as part of the nomination. The second year, 1929, there were no nominations at all, although the Academy has a list of unofficial titles which were under consideration by the Board of Judges. In the third year, 1930, films, not cinematographers, were nominated, and the final award did not show the cinematographer's name.

Finally, for the 1931 awards, the modern system in which individuals are nominated for a single film each was adopted in all profession-related categories. From 1939 to 1967 with the exception of 1957, there were also separate awards for color and for black-and-white cinematography. Since then, the only black-and-white film to win is Schindler's List (1993).

Floyd Crosby won the award for Tabu in 1931, which was the last silent film to win in this category. Hal Mohr won the only write-in Academy Award ever, in 1935 for A Midsummer Night's Dream. Mohr was also the first person to win for both black-and-white and color cinematography.

No winners are lost, although some of the earliest nominees (and of the unofficial nominees of 1928–29) are lost, including The Devil Dancer (1927), The Magic Flame (1927), and Four Devils (1928). The Right to Love (1930) is incomplete, and Sadie Thompson (1927) is incomplete and partially reconstructed with stills.

The first nominees shot primarily on digital video were The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and Slumdog Millionaire in 2009, with Slumdog Millionaire the first winner.[1] The following year Avatar was the first nominee and winner to be shot entirely on digital video.[2]

In 2018, Rachel Morrison became the first woman to receive a nomination. Prior to that it had been the last Academy Award category to never nominate a woman.[3][4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academy_Award_for_Best_Cinematography#Winners_and_nominees

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Source: IMDB
Filter: Votes >= 10000
Order: Votes Descending
Date: 2014-08-23

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Films and TV Programmes that remind me of being a kid - mainly 1980's stuff.

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Welcome to the days of disco and dirty deeds as we plunge into a new wave of movies: raw and renewed, unfiltered, while laying the groundwork for blockbuster era to come. Welcome to the 140 essential movies of the 1970s.

The two moods we aimed to capture in this countdown: The wilting of ’60s flower power optimism under the harsh light of urban reality and decay; meanwhile the destruction of the musty Hays Code — a musty ruleset that dictated what could be depicted on-screen for decades — suddenly allowing directors to pursue more personal expressions in film, often violent and sexual. You’ll find stories of lone men (Taxi Driver, Dog Day Afternoon) and women (Wanda, Norma Rae) against the system, and paranoid political thrillers (All the President’s Men, Three Days of the Condor). There are the horror hallmarks (Alien, Halloween) including international (Suspiria, Deep Red), and box office game changers (Star Wars, Jaws). Low-budget exploitation (The Last House on the Left, Mad Max), and a few things a willing warped mind can get off on (The Man Who Fell to Earth, The Holy Mountain). All movies considered for this list needed to have a Tomatometer (after 5 reviews) and have been made during the decade, even if it didn’t get a major release until later, e.g. Hausu or Killer of Sheep.

Now, let’s strut them mean streets, let’s do the time warp again, let’s have ourselves a close encounter with 140 essential 1970s movies!
Link: https://editorial.rottentomatoes.com/guide/essential-1970s-movies/

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Whether it is one of the dozens of plane crash films, or another sudden, but inevitable, natural disaster, I have a thing for these movies.

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From latest edition. 2017th edition will be published in October 2017.

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List of Nominees and Winners

  • ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

FRED ASTAIRE "The Towering Inferno"
JEFF BRIDGES "Thunderbolt and Lightfoot"
WINNER - ROBERT DE NIRO "The Godfather Part II"
MICHAEL V. GAZZO "The Godfather Part II"
LEE STRASBERG "The Godfather Part II"

  • ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

WINNER - INGRID BERGMAN "Murder on the Orient Express"
MADELINE KAHN "Blazing Saddles"
DIANE LADD "Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore"
TALIA SHIRE "The Godfather Part II"
VALENTINA CORTESE "Day for Night"

  • BEST PICTURE

"CHINATOWN" Robert Evans, Producer
"THE CONVERSATION" Francis Ford Coppola, Producer; Fred Roos, Co-Producer
WINNER - "THE GODFATHER PART II" Francis Ford Coppola, Producer; Gray Frederickson and Fred Roos, Co-Producers
"LENNY" Marvin Worth, Producer
"THE TOWERING INFERNO" Irwin Allen, Producer

  • CINEMATOGRAPHY

"CHINATOWN" John A. Alonzo
"EARTHQUAKE" Philip Lathrop
"LENNY" Bruce Surtees
"MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS" Geoffrey Unsworth
WINNER - "THE TOWERING INFERNO" Fred Koenekamp, Joseph Biroc

  • COSTUME DESIGN

"CHINATOWN" Anthea Sylbert
"DAISY MILLER" John Furness
"THE GODFATHER PART II" Theadora Van Runkle
WINNER "THE GREAT GATSBY" Theoni V. Aldredge
"MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS" Tony Walton

  • DIRECTING

"CHINATOWN" Roman Polanski
"DAY FOR NIGHT" Francois Truffaut
WINNER - "THE GODFATHER PART II" Francis Ford Coppola
"LENNY" Bob Fosse
"A WOMAN UNDER THE INFLUENCE" John Cassavetes

  • FILM EDITING

"BLAZING SADDLES" John C. Howard, Danford Greene
"CHINATOWN" Sam O'Steen
"EARTHQUAKE" Dorothy Spencer
"THE LONGEST YARD" Michael Luciano
WINNER - "THE TOWERING INFERNO" Harold F. Kress, Carl Kress

  • FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

WINNER - "AMARCORD" Italy
"CATS' PLAY" Hungary
"THE DELUGE" Poland
"LACOMBE, LUCIEN" France
"THE TRUCE" Argentina

  • ACTOR

ALBERT FINNEY "Murder on the Orient Express"
WINNER - ART CARNEY "Harry and Tonto"
DUSTIN HOFFMAN "Lenny"
JACK NICHOLSON "Chinatown"
AL PACINO "The Godfather Part II"

  • ACTRESS

WINNER - ELLEN BURSTYN "Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore"
DIAHANN CARROLL "Claudine"
FAYE DUNAWAY "Chinatown"
VALERIE PERRINE "Lenny"
GENA ROWLANDS "A Woman under the Influence"

  • ART DIRECTION

"CHINATOWN" Art Direction: Richard Sylbert, W. Stewart Campbell; Set Decoration: Ruby Levitt
"EARTHQUAKE" Art Direction: Alexander Golitzen, E. Preston Ames; Set Decoration: Frank McKelvy
WINNER - "THE GODFATHER PART II" Art Direction: Dean Tavoularis, Angelo Graham; Set Decoration: George R. Nelson
"THE ISLAND AT THE TOP OF THE WORLD" Art Direction: Peter Ellenshaw, John B. Mansbridge, Walter Tyler, Al Roelofs; Set Decoration: Hal Gausman
"THE TOWERING INFERNO" Art Direction: William Creber, Ward Preston; Set Decoration: Raphael Bretton

  • MUSIC (SONG)

"Benji's Theme (I Feel Love)" from "BENJI"; Music by Euel Box; Lyrics by Betty Box
"Blazing Saddles" from "BLAZING SADDLES"; Music by John Morris; Lyrics by Mel Brooks
"Little Prince" from "THE LITTLE PRINCE"; Music by Frederick Loewe; Lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner
WINNER - "We May Never Love Like This Again" from "THE TOWERING INFERNO"; Music and Lyrics by Al Kasha and Joel Hirschhorn
"Wherever Love Takes Me" from "GOLD"; Music by Elmer Bernstein; Lyrics by Don Black

  • WRITING (ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY)

"ALICE DOESN'T LIVE HERE ANYMORE" Robert Getchell
WINNER - "CHINATOWN" Robert Towne
"THE CONVERSATION" Francis Ford Coppola
"DAY FOR NIGHT Francois Truffaut, Jean-Louis Richard, Suzanne Schiffman
"HARRY AND TONTO" Paul Mazursky, Josh Greenfeld

  • DOCUMENTARY (SHORT SUBJECT)

"CITY OUT OF WILDERNESS" Francis Thompson, Producer
WINNER - "DON'T" Robin Lehman, Producer
"EXPLORATORIUM" Jon Boorstin, Producer
"JOHN MUIR'S HIGH SIERRA" Dewitt Jones and Lesley Foster, Producers
"NAKED YOGA" Ronald S. Kass and Mervyn Lloyd, Producers

  • DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE)

"ANTONIA: A PORTRAIT OF THE WOMAN" Judy Collins and Jill Godmilow, Producers
"THE CHALLENGE...A TRIBUTE TO MODERN ART" Herbert Kline, Producer
WINNER - "HEARTS AND MINDS" Peter Davis and Bert Schneider, Producers
"THE 81ST BLOW" Jacquot Ehrlich, David Bergman and Haim Gouri, Producers
"THE WILD AND THE BRAVE" Natalie R. Jones and Eugene S. Jones, Producers

  • JEAN HERSHOLT HUMANITARIAN AWARD

WINNER - Arthur B. Krim

  • SOUND

"CHINATOWN" Bud Grenzbach, Larry Jost
"THE CONVERSATION" Walter Murch, Arthur Rochester
WINNER - "EARTHQUAKE" Ronald Pierce, Melvin Metcalfe, Sr.
"THE TOWERING INFERNO" Theodore Soderberg, Herman Lewis
"YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN" Richard Portman, Gene Cantamessa

  • MUSIC (ORIGINAL DRAMATIC SCORE)

"CHINATOWN" Jerry Goldsmith
WINNER - "THE GODFATHER PART II" Nino Rota, Carmine Coppola
"MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS" Richard Rodney Bennett
"SHANKS" Alex North
"THE TOWERING INFERNO" John Williams

  • SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARD (VISUAL EFFECTS)

WINNER - "EARTHQUAKE" Frank Brendel, Glen Robinson, Albert Whitlock

  • MUSIC (SCORING: ORIGINAL SONG SCORE AND ADAPTATION -OR- SCORING: ADAPTATION)

WINNER - "THE GREAT GATSBY" Adaptation Score by Nelson Riddle
"THE LITTLE PRINCE" Song Score by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe; Adaptation Score by Angela Morley and Douglas Gamley
"PHANTOM OF THE PARADISE" Song Score by Paul Williams; Adaptation Score by Paul Williams and George Aliceson Tipton

  • SHORT FILM (ANIMATED)

WINNER - "CLOSED MONDAYS" Will Vinton and Bob Gardiner, Producers
"THE FAMILY THAT DWELT APART" Yvon Mallette and Robert Verrall, Producers
"HUNGER" Peter Foldes and René Jodoin, Producers
"VOYAGE TO NEXT" Faith Hubley and John Hubley, Producers
"WINNIE THE POOH AND TIGGER TOO" Wolfgang Reitherman, Producer

  • SHORT FILM (LIVE ACTION)

"CLIMB" Dewitt Jones, Producer
"THE CONCERT" Julian Chagrin and Claude Chagrin, Producers
WINNER - "ONE-EYED MEN ARE KINGS" Paul Claudon and Edmond Sechan, Producers
"PLANET OCEAN" George V. Casey, Producer
"THE VIOLIN" Andrew Welsh and George Pastic, Producers

  • WRITING (SCREENPLAY ADAPTED FROM OTHER MATERIAL)

"THE APPRENTICESHIP OF DUDDY KRAVITZ" Screenplay by Mordecai Richler; Adaptation by Lionel Chetwynd
WINNER - "THE GODFATHER PART II" Francis Ford Coppola, Mario Puzo
"LENNY" Julian Barry
"MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS" Paul Dehn
"YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN" Gene Wilder, Mel Brooks

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Best Film Releases of the 70s

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Movies included in my 2019 weekly challenges on Letterboxd

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