• 0%
    0 votes
  • Rate this season
    What did you think?
    PosterPoster

    Beyond Belief

    Season 2008 2008

    • 2008-10-04T06:00:00+02:00
    • 60 mins
    • 1 day, 20 hours, 0 mins
    • Special Interest

    Just 40 years after a famous TIME magazine cover asked "Is God Dead?" the answer appears to be a resounding "No!" According to a survey by the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life in a recent issue of Foreign Policy magazine, "God is Winning". Religions are increasingly a geopolitical force to be reckoned with. Fundamentalist movements - some violent in the extreme - are growing. Science and religion are at odds in the classrooms and courtrooms. And a return to religious values is widely touted as an antidote to the alleged decline in public morality. After two centuries, could this be twilight for the Enlightenment project and the beginning of a new age of unreason? Will faith and dogma trump rational inquiry, or will it be possible to reconcile religious and scientific worldviews? Can evolutionary biology, anthropology and neuroscience help us to better understand how we construct beliefs, and experience empathy, fear and awe? Can science help us create a new rational narrative as poetic and powerful as those that have traditionally sustained societies? Can we treat religion as a natural phenomenon? Can we be good without God? And if not God, then what?

    44 episodes

    2008x01 Roger Bingham

    • Season Premiere

      2008-10-04T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Roger Bingham is Co-founder and Director of The Science Network. He is also a member of the Computational Neurobiology Laboratory at the Salk Institute of Biological Studies and the Institute for Neural Computation at UC San Diego. He is the co-author of The Origin of Minds: Evolution, Uniqueness, and the New Science of the Self, and the creator and host of Emmy award-winning PBS science programs on evolutionary psychology and cognitive neuroscience, including the critically acclaimed series The Human Quest.

    2008x02 Anthony Grayling

    • 2008-10-04T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Anthony Grayling is Professor of Philosophy at Birbeck College, University of London, and a Supernumerary Fellow of St Anne's College, Oxford. He has written and edited many books on philosophy and other subjects; among his most recent are a biography of William Hazlitt and a collection of essays. For several years he wrote the "Last Word" column for the Guardian and is a regular reviewer for the Times Literary Review and the Financial Times.

    2008x03 Sonja Lyubormirsky

    • 2008-10-04T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Sonja Lyubomirsky is Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Riverside. Her honors include a Faculty of the Year Award, Faculty Mentor of the Year Award, a Templeton Positive Psychology Prize, and a million-dollar grant from NIMH to conduct research on the possibility of permanently increasing happiness. Her book, The How of Happiness, was released in January 2008 by Penguin Press and translated into 15 languages.

    2008x04 Owen Flanagan

    • 2008-10-04T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Owen Flanagan is James B. Duke Professor of Philosophy at Duke University. He also holds appointments in Psychology and Neurobiology and is a Faculty Fellow in Cognitive Neuroscience. In 1998, he was recipient of the Romanell National Phi Beta Kappa award, given annually to one American philosopher for distinguished contributions to philosophy and the public understanding of philosophy. He has written several books; the most recent is The Really Hard Problem: Meaning in a Material World.

    2008x05 Guven Guzeldere

    • 2008-10-04T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Güven Güzeldere is Associate Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences and of Neurobiology at Duke University. He has published articles on philosophy of mind, history and philosophy of psychology, and artificial intelligence. He is a founder of Stanford Electronic Humanities Review, a founding associate editor of Psyche: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research on Consciousness, and a founding member of the Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness.

    2008x06 George Koob

    • 2008-10-04T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    George F. Koob is a Professor and Chair of the Committee on the Neurobiology of Addictive Disorders at The Scripps Research Institute and Adjunct Professor in the Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry, and Adjunct Professor in the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at UC San Diego. Dr. Koob's research interests are directed at the neurobiology of drug addiction, with a focus on the theoretical constructs of reward and stress.

    2008x07 Panel - Human Flourishing

    • 2008-10-04T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    With Sonja Lyubomirsky, Owen Flanagan, Güven Güzeldere, Anthony Grayling, and George Koob Moderated by Roger Bingham

    2008x08 Roger Bingham

    • 2008-10-04T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Roger Bingham is Co-founder and Director of The Science Network. He is also a member of the Computational Neurobiology Laboratory at the Salk Institute of Biological Studies and the Institute for Neural Computation at UC San Diego. He is the co-author of The Origin of Minds: Evolution, Uniqueness, and the New Science of the Self, and the creator and host of Emmy award-winning PBS science programs on evolutionary psychology and cognitive neuroscience, including the critically acclaimed series The Human Quest.

    2008x09 Naomi Oreskes

    • 2008-10-04T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Naomi Oreskes is Provost of Sixth College, Professor of History and Science Studies and Adjunct Professor of Geosciences at UC San Diego and one of the nation's leading experts on the history of the earth and environmental science. Her work came to public attention in 2004 with the publication of "The Scientific Consensus on Climate Change" in Science and was featured in Vice President Gore's film, An Inconvenient Truth. Her forthcoming book is FIGHTING FACTS: How a Handful of Scientists Have Muddied the Waters on Environmental Issues From Tobacco to Global Warming.

    2008x10 Chris Mooney & Sheril Kirshenbaum

    • 2008-10-04T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Sheril Kirshenbaum is co-author of Unscientific America: How Scientific Illiteracy Threatens Our Future with Chris Mooney describing the growing disconnect between science and society. She has worked in the Senate on energy, climate, and ocean policy and helped found ScienceDebate2008. A former pop radio disc jockey and musician, Sheril is now a science writer and Seed blogger based at Duke University. Chris Mooney is a contributing editor to Science Progress, senior correspondent for The American Prospect magazine and author of two books - the New York Times bestselling The Republican War on Science and Storm World: Hurricanes, Politics, and the Battle Over Global Warming. He also writes “The Intersection” blog with Sheril Kirshenbaum.

    2008x11 Tony Haymet

    • 2008-10-04T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Tony Haymet is the tenth director of Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego. Haymet also serves as UC San Diego's Vice Chancellor for Marine Sciences and Dean of the Graduate School of Marine Sciences, and is a Professor of Oceanography at Scripps and Chemistry at UC San Diego. Tony is a founder and currently Vice-Chair of CleanTech San Diego, a business development organization dedicated to the practical response to climate change issues.

    2008x12 This Is Your Brain on Politics

    • 2008-10-04T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    With Chris Mooney, Sheril Kirshenbaum, and Tony Haymet. Moderated by Roger Bingham

    2008x13 Roger Bingham

    • 2008-10-04T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Roger Bingham is Co-founder and Director of The Science Network. He is also a member of the Computational Neurobiology Laboratory at the Salk Institute of Biological Studies and the Institute for Neural Computation at UC San Diego. He is the co-author of The Origin of Minds: Evolution, Uniqueness, and the New Science of the Self, and the creator and host of Emmy award-winning PBS science programs on evolutionary psychology and cognitive neuroscience, including the critically acclaimed series The Human Quest.

    2008x14 Peter Turchin

    • 2008-10-04T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Peter Turchin is Professor of Ecology and Mathematics at the University of Connecticut. He is the author of more than 100 articles including ten in Nature and Science. He has written five books, the latest of which is War and Peace and War: The Life Cycles of Imperial Nations, Pi Press. Much of his work concerns a new field known as cliodynamics, which attempts to discover general principles that explain the functioning and dynamics of historical societies.

    2008x15 Sally Saytel

    • 2008-10-04T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Sally Satel is a scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, and staff psychiatrist at the Oasis Clinic in Washington, D.C. She has published articles on cultural aspects of medicine and science in The New York Times, New Republic, Commentary, Atlantic Monthly, New York Times Magazine, and Wall Street Journal. Dr. Satel is the author of PC, M.D.: How Political Correctness Is Corrupting Medicine; Drug Treatment: The Case for Coercion; and coauthor of One Nation Under Therapy.

    2008x16 V.S. Ramachandran

    • 2008-10-04T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    V.S. Ramachandran is Director of the Center for Brain and Cognition and Professor with the Psychology Department and the Neurosciences Program at UC San Diego. A former BBC Reith Lecturer, he co-authored Phantoms in the Brain: Probing the Mysteries of the Human Mind, with Sandra Blakeslee, and is the author of A Brief Tour of Human Consciousness and a forthcoming book on human uniqueness.

    2008x17 Panel - Human Flourishing Continued

    • 2008-10-04T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    With Peter Turchin, Sally Satel, and V.S. Ramachandran. Moderated by Roger Bingham

    2008x18 Roger Bingham

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Roger Bingham is Co-founder and Director of The Science Network. He is also a member of the Computational Neurobiology Laboratory at the Salk Institute of Biological Studies and the Institute for Neural Computation at UC San Diego. He is the co-author of The Origin of Minds: Evolution, Uniqueness, and the New Science of the Self, and the creator and host of Emmy award-winning PBS science programs on evolutionary psychology and cognitive neuroscience, including the critically acclaimed series The Human Quest.

    2008x19 Jonathan Haidt

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Jonathan Haidt is an Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Virginia. He studies the emotional and intuitive foundations of morality. His current work is based on the idea that morality is a team sport and that political liberals don't understand the game the other side is playing. He is the author of The Happiness Hypothesis and is currently writing The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion.

    Sam Harris is the author of The New York Times bestsellers, The End of Faith: Religion, Terror and the Future of Reason which won the 2005 PEN/Martha Albrand Award for First Nonfiction, and Letter to a Christian Nation. His writing has appeared in Newsweek, Los Angeles Times, The Atlantic, The Times (London), The Boston Globe, The Annals of Neurology, and elsewhere. He is currently researching the neural basis of religious belief while completing a doctorate in neuroscience. He is also a Co-Founder and Chairman of The Reason Project.

    2008x21 Jonathan Glover

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Jonathan Glover is Professor at the Centre of Medical Law & Ethics at King's College London, as well as a Distinguished Research Fellow at the Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics. His books include Humanity: A Moral History of the Twentieth Century, What Sort of People Should There Be? and Causing Death and Saving Lives, the first philosophical study of the then futuristic issues of genetic engineering and of neuroethics. He is currently interested in a number of issues in global ethics and ethical issues in psychiatry.

    2008x22 Marco Iacoboni

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Marco Iacoboni is Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences and Director of the Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Lab at the Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping Center. He is also a member of the Brain Research Institute and of the UCLA Center for Culture, Brain, and Development. Iacoboni studies the neural mechanisms of imitation and social cognition in humans, and he is author of the recent book on mirror neurons entitled Mirroring People: The New Science of How We Connect with Others.

    2008x23 Patricia Churchland

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Patricia Smith Churchland, UC President's Professor of Philosophy, UC San Diego, focuses on neuroethics and attempts to understand choice, responsibility and the basis of moral norms in terms of brain function, evolution and brain-culture interactions. Her books include Brain-Wise, Neurophilosophy: Towrds a Unified Science of the Mind-Brain and On the Contrary, with Paul M. Churchland.

    2008x24 This Is Your Brain on Morality

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    With Jonathan Haidt, Sam Harris, Jonathan Glover, Marco Iacoboni, and Patricia Churchland. Moderated by Roger Bingham

    2008x25 Roger Bingham

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Roger Bingham is Co-founder and Director of The Science Network. He is also a member of the Computational Neurobiology Laboratory at the Salk Institute of Biological Studies and the Institute for Neural Computation at UC San Diego. He is the co-author of The Origin of Minds: Evolution, Uniqueness, and the New Science of the Self, and the creator and host of Emmy award-winning PBS science programs on evolutionary psychology and cognitive neuroscience, including the critically acclaimed series The Human Quest.

    2008x26 Brian Knutson

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Brian Knutson is Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Stanford University. His laboratory uses multiple methods (e.g., psychometrics, psychophysiology, brain imaging, and pharmacology) to investigate neural mechanisms that support emotional experience, and explores implications for clinical disorders of affect and addiction, as well as for economic decision-making. He has received Young Investigator Awards from the American Psychiatric Association, the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression, and the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research.

    2008x27 Paul Zak

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Paul J. Zak is the founding Director of the Center for Neuroeconomics Studies and Professor of Economics at Claremont Graduate University. Zak also serves as Professor of Neurology at Loma Linda University Medical Center, and is a Senior Researcher at UCLA. Zak is credited with the first published use of the term “neuroeconomics” and has been a vanguard in this new discipline. He organized and administers the first doctoral program in neuroeconomics in the world.

    2008x28 Terry Sejnowski

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Terrence Sejnowski is an HHMI investigator, the Francis Crick Professor and Director of the Crick-Jacobs Center for Theoretical and Computational Biology at the Salk Institute. He is author of several books including The Computational Brain and Liars, Lovers, and Heroes: What the New Brain Science Reveals About How We Become Who We Are.

    2008x29 Philip Zimbardo

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Philip Zimbardo is Professor Emeritus at Stanford University and is internationally recognized as a leading "voice and face of contemporary psychology" through his widely seen PBS-TV series, Discovering Psychology, his media appearances, best-selling trade books on shyness, and his classic research, The Stanford Prison Experiment. He is the author of over 300 professional publications and 50 books including the oldest current textbook in psychology, Psychology and Life, and The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil.

    2008x30 This Is Your Brain on Money

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    With Brian Knutson, Paul Zak, Terry Sejnowski, and Philip Zimbardo. Moderated by Roger Bingham

    2008x31 Walter Sinnott-Armstrong

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Walter Sinnott-Armstrong is Professor of Philosophy and the Hardy Professor of Legal Studies at Dartmouth College, as well as the Co-director of the MacArthur Law and Neuroscience Project. His research interests include ethics, philosophy of law, epistemology, and informal logic. Currently he is working on moral psychology and brain science, and the uses and implications of neuroscience for legal systems. He has recently edited three volumes on the evolution, cognitive science and neuroscience of morality.

    2008x32 Amanda Pustilnik

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Amanda Pustilnik conducts research and teaches in the area of law and neuroscience at Harvard Law School. She is a graduate of Yale Law School, practiced litigation at Sullivan & Cromwell and Covington & Burling, and has served as a visiting scholar at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, in History of Science. She is also counsel to the Board of Network 20/20, a foreign policy not-for-profit organization.

    2008x33 Nita Farahany

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Nita Farahany researches and writes about the intersection of criminal law, genetics, neuroscience and philosophy. She does so with an interdisciplinary background in Genetics from Dartmouth College, a master's degree concentrating in biology, from Harvard University, and a J.D., M.A. and Ph.D. in philosophy of biology and philosophy of law from Duke University. She is the editor of forthcoming volume Genes and Justice: The Impact of Behavioral Genetics and Neuroscience on Criminal Law.

    2008x34 Adam Kolber

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Adam Kolber is a law professor at the University of San Diego who recently completed a Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Fellowship at Princeton University's Center for Human Values. He writes about legal and ethical implications of emerging neurotechnologies. Most recently, he has written about methods of measuring pain and punishment. He runs the "Neuroethics & Law Blog" and is an associate editor of the journal Neuroethics.

    2008x35 Erin O'Hara

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Erin O'Hara is Professor of Law, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, and Director of the Law and Human Behavior Program at Vanderbilt University Law School. One of Erin’s primary research interests involves conciliation: the effort to integrate theoretical and empirical insights from multiple academic fields, including economics, positive political theory, cognitive psychology, behavioral biology, and neuroscience, to more effectively formulate legal policies that regulate human behavior.

    2008x36 This Is Your Brain on Law

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    With Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Erin O'Hara, Amanda Pustilnik, Adam Kolber, and Nita Farahany. Moderated by Roger Bingham

    2008x37 Lawrence Krauss

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Lawrence M. Krauss is Foundation Professor in the School of Earth and Space Exploration and the Physics Department, Co-Director of the Cosmology Initiative and Inaugural Director of the Origins Initiative at Arizona State University. He is an internationally known theoretical physicist with wide research interests, including the interface between elementary particle physics and cosmology, where his studies include the early universe, the nature of dark matter, general relativity and neutrino astrophysics.

    2008x38 Beatrice Golomb

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Beatrice Golomb is Associate Professor of Medicine at UC San Diego, best known for her work on Gulf War Illness (she has testified before Congress, her RAND reports have changed US policy, and she served as Scientific Director and Chief Scientist for the Department of Veterans Affairs Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans Illnesses). She also heads the UC San Diego Statin Study group. Her work has engendered broad media interest, from The New York Times to Jon Stewart's The Daily Show.

    2008x39 Sir Harold Kroto

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Sir Harold Kroto is Francis Eppes Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Florida State University. In 1996, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery of C60 Buckminsterfullerene. In 1995, he inaugurated the Vega Science Trust, and in 2007, he started the Global Education Outreach in Science, Engineering and Technology (GEOSET) at FSU. He has received many scientific awards including the Royal Society's prestigious Michael Faraday Award. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2007.

    2008x40 Chris Mooney and Sheril Kirshenbaum

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Sheril Kirshenbaum is co-author of Unscientific America: How Scientific Illiteracy Threatens Our Future with Chris Mooney describing the growing disconnect between science and society. She has worked in the Senate on energy, climate, and ocean policy and helped found ScienceDebate2008. A former pop radio disc jockey and musician, Sheril is now a science writer and Seed blogger based at Duke University. Chris Mooney is a contributing editor to Science Progress, senior correspondent for The American Prospect magazine and author of two books - The New York Times bestselling The Republican War on Science and Storm World: Hurricanes, Politics, and the Battle Over Global Warming. He also writes “The Intersection” blog with Sheril Kirshenbaum.

    2008x41 Leon Lederman

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Leon Lederman is Director Emeritus of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, Illinois and Professor of Science at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago. He founded the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy in Aurora, Illinois in 1986, and has served in the capacity of Resident Scholar since 1998. He has also served as President and Chairman of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and has received numerous awards including the Nobel Prize in Physics (1988).

    2008x42 Michael Shermer

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Michael Shermer is the Founding Publisher of Skeptic magazine, a monthly columnist for Scientific American, the host of the Skeptics Distinguished Science Lecture Series at Caltech and Adjunct Professor of Economics at Claremont Graduate University. His most recent book on evolutionary economics is The Mind of the Market. He is also the author of Why Darwin Matters: Evolution and the Case Against Intelligent Design and How We Believe: Science, Skepticism, and the Search for God.

    2008x43 This Is Your Brain on Politics Continued

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    With Lawrence Krauss, Leon Lederman, Chris Mooney, Sheril Kirshenbaum, Michael Shermer, Beatrice Golomb, and Harold Kroto. Moderated by Roger Bingham

    2008x44 Peter Atkins

    • 2008-10-05T06:00:00+02:00 — 60 mins

    Peter Atkins was Professor of Chemistry at the University of Oxford from 1965 until his retirement in 2007. He is the author of over 60 books including Four Laws That Drive the Universe; Galileo's Fingers: The Ten Great Ideas of Science; and the world-renowned textbook Physical Chemistry. He is involved in a variety of international activities including chairing the Committee on Chemistry Education of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry and organizing the Malta series of conferences.

    Loading...