• 68%
    27 votes
  • Rate this show
    What did you think?
  • 505
    watchers
  • 114k
    plays
  • 85.0k
    collected
  • 231
    lists
  • 2018-09-23T21:00:00-04:00s at 2018-09-23T21:00:00-04:00 on ESPN
  • 1970-05-09T02:00:00+01:00
  • 60 mins
  • 15 days, 12 hours, 0 mins
  • United States
  • English
The World Series of Poker is the most prestigious set of poker tournaments in the world.

608 episodes

Special 10 Main Event Live Day 3 Morning webcast

  • 2011-07-15T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

Welcome to 2011 World Series of Poker at the Rio All-Suites Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada. It's Day 3 of the Main Event. 6,865 players bought in for $10,000 apiece. David Chuckman and Brendan Adams commentate coming into Day 3 in this morning webcast. 1,866 players remain.

Special 11 Main Event Live Day 4 Morning webcast

  • 2011-07-16T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

It's Day 4 of the Main Event with 852 players remaining, but only 693 spots pay. It's bubble day.

Special 12 Main Event Live Day 5 Morning webcast

  • 2011-07-17T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

The webcast of Day 5's morning session starts with 378 hopeful players remaining.

Special 15 Main Event Live Day 8 Morning webcast

  • 2011-07-20T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

22 players remain at the start of Day 8's morning webcast.

Special 17 WSOP 2018 $3K No Limit Hold'em Shootout

  • 2018-06-03T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

There's $226,218 up top for the winner with Joe McKeehen, Joe Cada, Jeff Trudeau, Sam Philips, Ihar Soika, Harry Lodge, Anthony Reategui, Joshua Turner, Taylor Wilson, and Jack Maskill battling it out. Commentary provided by Ali Nejad and Maria Ho.

1973x01 Main Event

  • Season Premiere

    no air date — 60 mins

1978x01 Main Event

  • Season Premiere

    no air date — 60 mins

1979x01 Main Event

  • Season Premiere

    no air date — 60 mins

1981x01 Main Event

  • Season Premiere

    no air date — 60 mins

1983x01 Main Event

  • Season Premiere

    no air date — 60 mins

1987x01 Main Event

  • Season Premiere

    no air date — 60 mins

1988x01 Main Event

  • Season Premiere

    no air date — 60 mins

1989x01 Main Event

  • Season Premiere

    no air date — 60 mins

1990x01 Main Event

  • Season Premiere

    no air date — 60 mins

1991x01 Main Event

  • Season Premiere

    no air date — 60 mins

1993x01 Main Event

  • Season Premiere

    no air date — 60 mins

1994x01 Main Event

  • Season Premiere

    no air date — 60 mins

1995x01 Main Event

  • Season Premiere

    no air date — 60 mins

1997x01 Main Event

  • Season Premiere

    no air date — 60 mins

1998x01 Main Event

  • Season Premiere

    no air date — 60 mins

1999x01 Main Event

  • Season Premiere

    no air date — 60 mins

2000x01 Main Event

  • Season Premiere

    no air date — 60 mins

2001x01 Main Event

  • Season Premiere

    no air date — 60 mins

2004x33 Main Event Episode 1

  • 2004-08-18T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

The greatest poker players from around the world have gotten together for the chance at Five-million Dollars! The Poker legends like Dan Harrington, Chris "Jesus" Ferguson , Mike Matusow, and Cyndy Violette have all returned looking to add to their historic legacy. They will be challenged by the younger likes of Erin Ness, Gavin Anderson, and David Williams. Will one of the great players of the Poker past add to their legacy, or will a "Young Gun" take over the reins which is "The World Champion of Poker.

2004x34 Main Event Episode 2

  • 2004-08-18T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

Witness the unbelievable story of Poker player Rafe Furst. He chose to compete in the 2003 WSOP and lost an astounding Ten-Thousand Dollars in 11 Minutes! Furst is back for more and is primed for better success this time at the Poker table.

2004x35 Main Event Episode 3

  • 2004-08-25T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

It's day 3 of the main event, and the field has been whittled down to 1,200 people. At the featured table, a dream matchup begins, Scott Fischman vs. Doyle Brunson. This is Poker's newest superstar vs. perhaps the greatest player who ever lived. Fischman, who won two bracelets in his world series of poker debut this year, wasn't even born when Brunson won his second main event title in 1978, but they battle on day three to settle the war that has been brewing throughout the World Series of Poker: old school vs. young gun. Other featured players: Annie Duke, Howard Lederer, Phil Hellmuth.

2004x36 Main Event Episode 4

  • 2004-08-25T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

277 players remain, but only 225 will finish in the money. That sense of urgency envelopes day four of the main event. At the featured table, one of the games most aggressive and colorful figures, Gus Hansen. Also included, the incredible Cinderella Story of female poker player Erin Ness. She once thought that she would not last a day at the hailed World Series of Poker. However, the Poker stay for Ness is now getting longer each and every day. Meet the "Poker Cinderella" Erin Ness, Right Now at the World Series of Poker!

2004x37 Main Event Episode 5

  • 2004-09-01T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

Another 90 players will see their World Series of Poker dream end as the field whittles itself down from 149 to 87. Rose Ritchie, the last female remaining in the field, tries to become only the second woman to make the final table. Mike "the mouth" Matasow is at the featured table, hoping to avoid the infamous "Mike Matasow blow-up," a self-destructive move that seems to always spell his doom. Other featured players: Dan Harrington, Josh Arieh and 21-year-old John Murphy.

2004x38 Main Event Episode 6

  • 2004-09-01T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

From a field that started at 2,576, only 86 remain. There are only three former World Champions among them: Doyle Brunson, Chris "Jesus" Ferguson and Dan Harrington. So far, each has endured a minefield of obstacles, including bad luck, bad bets and the largest poker field in history. Can their good fortune continue? Other featured players: Josh Arieh, Marcel Luske, John Murphy, and Davin Andersson.

2004x39 Main Event Episode 7

  • 2004-09-08T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

From 50 players down to 32. The spotlight is on Holland's Marcel Luske, one of the world's most charismatic players. After singing, joking and talking his way to a 14th place finish last year, he seeks to improve this year. In addition, Poker great Gavin Anderson explains how he was able to win a Two-Thousand-Five Hundred Dollar poker pot. He accomplished this feat at the tender age of Eight. Now older and wiser, does he have what it takes to win Five-Million Dollars?

2004x40 Main Event Episode 8

  • 2004-09-08T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

From 32 players down to 17. It's day 6 and crunch time is upon the field as it whittles itself down to the final two tables. The chip leader is John Murphy, who at the age of 21 is the youngest player remaining in the field. Two former World Champions, Chris Ferguson and Dan Harrington are hot on his heels. This show also examines the essential antics of getting inside the head of an opponent when playing Poker.

2004x41 Main Event Episode 9

  • 2004-09-15T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

Only 17 players remain from a record setting field of 2,576. And of those 17 players, the two biggest stars are 1995 world champ Dan Harrington and the flamboyant Marcel Luske of Holland. Each has survived a roller coaster five days of poker to reach this point, handling bad beats, wild swings and the fickle poker gods with grace and a sense of humor. The road to the final table will not be easy however, standing in their way is chip leader Greg Raymer and 21 year old phenom John Murphy. At the end of the hour, only nine players will be left standing, only nine players still in the hunt for five million dollars.

2004x42 Main Event Final Table

  • 2004-09-15T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

The final table. At stake: Five Million Dollars which is the richest cash prize in poker history, sports tournament history and television history. Dan Harrington comes to the final table having already accomplished one of the great feats in poker history. Last year, he bested 836 players to finish third behind Chris Moneymaker and Sam Farha. This year, he outlasted a staggering 2,567 players to make it this far. Should he win, he will join legends like Doyle Brunson, Johnny Chan, Johnny Moss and Stu Ungar as multiple winners of poker's most prestigious title.

The first event took place on 1 September 2004 with invitations only being extended to ten of the most well-known names on the poker tournament circuit. The winner took home a $2,000,000 prize. No other participants received prize money.

2006x01 New Orleans Circuit Event Part 1

  • Season Premiere

    no air date — 60 mins

Final table where 170 players compete for a $1,615,000 prize pool.

Final table where 170 players compete for a $1,615,000 prize pool.

Final table where 96 players compete for a $931,200 prize pool.

Final table where 134 players compete for a $1,259,600 prize pool.

Final table where 134 players compete for a $1,259,600 prize pool.

Final table where 134 players compete for a $1,259,600 prize pool.

Final table where 241 players compete for a $2,289,500 prize pool.

Final table where 241 players compete for a $2,289,500 prize pool.

Final table where 241 players compete for a $2,289,500 prize pool.

Final table where 241 players compete for a $2,289,500 prize pool.

Final table where 2,776 players compete for a $3,789,240 prize pool.

Final table where 1,102 players compete for a $1,504,230 prize pool.

Final table where 824 players compete for a $1,895,200 prize pool.

Final table where 824 players compete for a $1,895,200 prize pool.

Final table where 752 players (+ 1670 rebuys) compete for a $2,317,887 prize pool.

Final table where 218 players compete for a $2,049,200 prize pool.

Final table where 2,891 players compete for a $2,891,000 prize pool.

Final table where 562 players compete for a $1,292,600 prize pool.

Final table where 143 players compete for a $6,864,000 prize pool.

Final table where 143 players compete for a $6,864,000 prize pool.

2006x21 Main Event Day 1A

  • no air date — 60 mins

The largest poker event in history: 8,773 players compete for a $82,512,162 prize pool.

2006x22 Main Event Day 1B

  • no air date — 60 mins

The largest poker event in history: 8,773 players compete for a $82,512,162 prize pool.

2006x23 Main Event Day 1C

  • no air date — 60 mins

The largest poker event in history: 8,773 players compete for a $82,512,162 prize pool.

2006x24 Main Event Day 2

  • no air date — 60 mins

The largest poker event in history: 8,773 players compete for a $82,512,162 prize pool.

2006x25 Main Event Day 3

  • no air date — 60 mins

The largest poker event in history: 8,773 players compete for a $82,512,162 prize pool.

2006x26 Main Event Day 4

  • no air date — 60 mins

The largest poker event in history: 8,773 players compete for a $82,512,162 prize pool.

2006x27 Main Event Day 5

  • no air date — 60 mins

The largest poker event in history: 8,773 players compete for a $82,512,162 prize pool.

2006x28 Main Event Day 6

  • no air date — 60 mins

The largest poker event in history: 8,773 players compete for a $82,512,162 prize pool.

The largest poker event in history: 8,773 players compete for a $82,512,162 prize pool.

The largest poker event in history: 8,773 players compete for a $82,512,162 prize pool.

The largest poker event in history: 8,773 players compete for a $82,512,162 prize pool.

The largest poker event in history: 8,773 players compete for a $82,512,162 prize pool.

27 players compete for a $2,000,000 prize pool.

27 players compete for a $2,000,000 prize pool.

2007x01 Event #1 - $5,000 Mixed Hold'em World Championship

  • Season Premiere

    2007-07-11T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

The first final table of the 2007 World Series of Poker is this Mixed Hold'em Limit/No-Limit Championship.

2007x02 Event #3 - $1,500 No Limit Hold'em

  • 2007-07-11T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

The final table of the $1,500 No-Limit Hold 'em event with just nine players left out of a field of nearly 3,000. The winner will walk away with a bracelet and $727,012.

2007x03 Event #4 - $1,500 Pot Limit Hold'em

  • 2007-07-18T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

The final table is down to 9 players from the original field of 781. Who will come out on top?

Final Table Seat 1: Costa Rican pro Humberto 'The Shark' Brenes — 275,000, Seat 2: Triple WSOP bracelet winner John Juanda — 220,000, Seat 3 Larry Jonsson — 900,000, Seat 4: Minh Ly — 240,000, Seat 5: Burt Boutin — 460,000, Seat 6: Rob Keston — 335,000, Seat 7: Sirous Jamshidi — 865,000,Seat 8: Dave 'Devilfish' Ulliott — 1,300,000 and Seat 9: Erik Cajelais — 1,075,000

Final Table Seat 1: Costa Rican pro Humberto 'The Shark' Brenes — 275,000, Seat 2: Triple WSOP bracelet winner John Juanda — 220,000, Seat 3 Larry Jonsson — 900,000, Seat 4: Minh Ly — 240,000, Seat 5: Burt Boutin — 460,000, Seat 6: Rob Keston — 335,000, Seat 7: Sirous Jamshidi — 865,000,Seat 8: Dave 'Devilfish' Ulliott — 1,300,000 and Seat 9: Erik Cajelais — 1,075,000

Final Table Gary Priegen 25,600, Daniel Negreanu 24,075, Tam Nguyen 23,575, Levon Torosyan 22,600, Vasilis Lazarou 21,025, Nick Frangos 19,325, Jeffrey Lisandro 18,700, Michael Huguenot 18,525, Nesbitt Coburn 18,500 and Jim Pechoc 18,300

2008x01 $10,000 Pot-Limit Hold'em World Championship Part 1

  • Season Premiere

    2008-07-23T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

First of 55 Bracelet Events at the 2008 World Series of Poker, played at the Rio All-Suite Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, NV. Start of the Final Table for the $10K World Championship Pot-Limit Hold'em.

Continuing the Final Table for the $10K World Championship Pot-Limit Hold'em.

Start of the Final Table for the $1.5K World Championship No-Limit Hold'em.

Continuing the Final Table for the $1.5K World Championship No-Limit Hold'em.

Prior to the start of the 2008 World Series of Poker, Bluff Magazine named five 21-year-old’s to watch and Jeff “YellowSub86” Williams was one of them. With a European Poker Tour title already under his belt many poker observers were counting on him having a big WSOP. Today will be the first chance for many poker fans to see Williams play as he is one of the nine players at the final table of Event #5 ($1,000 No Limit Hold’em w/rebuys). He’s joined by Alan Jaffray, Peter Gould and 2006 Main Event third place finisher Michael Binger. But the chip leader when the final table begins will be Michael Banducci. Making his run more impressive is the fact that Banducci had only one rebuy plus the double add-on in an event where multiple rebuys are common. In fact the 766 player field was responsible for 2,258 rebuys and add-ons pushing the prize pool to $2,894,094 with first place paying $636,736.

Prior to the start of the 2008 World Series of Poker, Bluff Magazine named five 21-year-old’s to watch and Jeff “YellowSub86” Williams was one of them. With a European Poker Tour title already under his belt many poker observers were counting on him having a big WSOP. Today will be the first chance for many poker fans to see Williams play as he is one of the nine players at the final table of Event #5 ($1,000 No Limit Hold’em w/rebuys). He’s joined by Alan Jaffray, Peter Gould and 2006 Main Event third place finisher Michael Binger. But the chip leader when the final table begins will be Michael Banducci. Making his run more impressive is the fact that Banducci had only one rebuy plus the double add-on in an event where multiple rebuys are common. In fact the 766 player field was responsible for 2,258 rebuys and add-ons pushing the prize pool to $2,894,094 with first place paying $636,736.

For the poker purist, the event is the World Championship and most of the 147 players who make up the field in the $50,000 H.O.R.S.E. World Championship consider it to be the player’s championship. The final table features three-time bracelet winner Barry Greenstein, 1996 World Champion Huck Seed, 1998 World Champion Scotty Nguyen, French pro Patrick Bueno, World Poker Tour co-founder and Big Game regular Lyle Berman and 2008 World Series of Poker Player-of-the-Year Erick Lindgren. There’s also two newcomers, Matt Glantz and Michael DeMichele at the table, giving viewers a little bit of everything. The table is star-studded for two reasons. The first is the $50,000 buy-in guarantees that only the best of the best of the best will be in the field. The second is that H.O.R.S.E. requires proficiency at the five fixed limit games played from start to finish; Hold’em, Omaha Eight-or-better, Razz, Seven-card Stud, Seven-card Stud Eight-or-better. The storylines entering final table play are seemingly endless. Lindgren was chasing his second bracelet only days after winning his first after years of chasing it and was in a dog fight for Player-of-the-Year Greenstein at the time. Seed was looking for his first bracelet since 2003 in hopes of regaining the respect of the poker world. And then there was Nguyen, who famously busted out of the 2007 Main Event in 11th spot after blowing up and relinquishing his chips in four hands. The 2008 event is also special for another reason. After Chip Reese, who won the inaugural $50,000 H.O.R.S.E. event in 2006, passed away last December WSOP Commissioner Jeffrey Pollack moved to create the Chip Reese Trophy, which would be awarded to the winner of the event every year and stay with that player until the following year’s event.

For the poker purist, the event is the World Championship and most of the 147 players who make up the field in the $50,000 H.O.R.S.E. World Championship consider it to be the player’s championship. The final table features three-time bracelet winner Barry Greenstein, 1996 World Champion Huck Seed, 1998 World Champion Scotty Nguyen, French pro Patrick Bueno, World Poker Tour co-founder and Big Game regular Lyle Berman and 2008 World Series of Poker Player-of-the-Year Erick Lindgren. There’s also two newcomers, Matt Glantz and Michael DeMichele at the table, giving viewers a little bit of everything. The table is star-studded for two reasons. The first is the $50,000 buy-in guarantees that only the best of the best of the best will be in the field. The second is that H.O.R.S.E. requires proficiency at the five fixed limit games played from start to finish; Hold’em, Omaha Eight-or-better, Razz, Seven-card Stud, Seven-card Stud Eight-or-better. The storylines entering final table play are seemingly endless. Lindgren was chasing his second bracelet only days after winning his first after years of chasing it and was in a dog fight for Player-of-the-Year Greenstein at the time. Seed was looking for his first bracelet since 2003 in hopes of regaining the respect of the poker world. And then there was Nguyen, who famously busted out of the 2007 Main Event in 11th spot after blowing up and relinquishing his chips in four hands. The 2008 event is also special for another reason. After Chip Reese, who won the inaugural $50,000 H.O.R.S.E. event in 2006, passed away last December WSOP Commissioner Jeffrey Pollack moved to create the Chip Reese Trophy, which would be awarded to the winner of the event every year and stay with that player until the following year’s event.

In 2007 Robert Mizrachi turned a few heads in the poker world when he became the first of the Mizrachi brothers to win a World Series of Poker bracelet. Everybody assumed that Michael “the Grinder” Mizrachi would be the first. He’d had some great success on the World Poker Tour and had been the brightest star in the family. But Robert’s win in the $10,000 World Championship Pot Limit Omaha event got him the bracelet and family bragging rights. The 2008 WSOP gave "the Grinder" a chance at redemption and he goes for his first bracelet in the same event his brother won a year earlier, $10,000 Pot Limit Omaha. The table certainly has international flavor to it. Peter Jetten of Toronto, Canada, Billy “the Croc” Argyros from Melbourne, Australia join Tom Hanlon of Dublin, Ireland and Marty Smyth of Belfast, Ireland. But despite the international intrigue, the story remains about Grinder. “Have brothers ever gone back-to-back?,” Mizrachi asked the day the final table started. The answer was no and in fact, only three sets of siblings each have a bracelet; Annie Duke and Howard Lederer, J.C. and Puggy Pearson and Grant and Blair Hinkle who each won a bracelet in 2008. Can Mizrachi pull of the historic win?

In 2007 Robert Mizrachi turned a few heads in the poker world when he became the first of the Mizrachi brothers to win a World Series of Poker bracelet. Everybody assumed that Michael “the Grinder” Mizrachi would be the first. He’d had some great success on the World Poker Tour and had been the brightest star in the family. But Robert’s win in the $10,000 World Championship Pot Limit Omaha event got him the bracelet and family bragging rights. The 2008 WSOP gave "the Grinder" a chance at redemption and he goes for his first bracelet in the same event his brother won a year earlier, $10,000 Pot Limit Omaha. The table certainly has international flavor to it. Peter Jetten of Toronto, Canada, Billy “the Croc” Argyros from Melbourne, Australia join Tom Hanlon of Dublin, Ireland and Marty Smyth of Belfast, Ireland. But despite the international intrigue, the story remains about Grinder. “Have brothers ever gone back-to-back?,” Mizrachi asked the day the final table started. The answer was no and in fact, only three sets of siblings each have a bracelet; Annie Duke and Howard Lederer, J.C. and Puggy Pearson and Grant and Blair Hinkle who each won a bracelet in 2008. Can Mizrachi pull of the historic win?

The preliminary events are all in the bag. There’s only one title left – and for every player, amateur or professional, it’s the one title they all want in their collection. This year a total of 6,844 players made their way to the Amazon Room at the Rio Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas in pursuit of the championship and the $9 million first place prize. Between now and October 28 ESPN will broadcast a total of 18 hours of Main Event coverage. From Phil Hellmuth’s grand entrance to the return to action of 2007 Main Event champion Jerry Yang, ESPN is turning this year’s Main Event into something more. It will also be the first time that poker fans will be introduced to the November Nine – the final nine players who will return to the Rio in November for a shot at the World Championship.

The preliminary events are all in the bag. There’s only one title left – and for every player, amateur or professional, it’s the one title they all want in their collection. This year a total of 6,844 players made their way to the Amazon Room at the Rio Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas in pursuit of the championship and the $9 million first place prize. Between now and October 28 ESPN will broadcast a total of 18 hours of Main Event coverage. From Phil Hellmuth’s grand entrance to the return to action of 2007 Main Event champion Jerry Yang, ESPN is turning this year’s Main Event into something more. It will also be the first time that poker fans will be introduced to the November Nine – the final nine players who will return to the Rio in November for a shot at the World Championship.

2009x15 Main Event Part 9

  • 2009-09-16T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

Main.Event.10K.Buy-In.

2009x16 Main Event Part 10

  • 2009-09-16T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

Main.Event.10K.Buy-In.

2009x17 Main Event Part 11

  • 2009-09-23T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

Main Event 10k Buy-In

2009x18 Main Event Part 12

  • 2009-09-23T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

Main Event 10k Buy-In

2010x01 $50,000 Players Championship Part 1

  • Season Premiere

    2010-07-28T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

David Baker Mikael Thuritz Vladimir Shchemelev John Juanda Daniel Alaei Michael Mizrachi David Oppenheim Robert Mizrachi

2010x02 $50,000 Players Championship Part 2

  • 2010-07-28T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

David Baker Mikael Thuritz Vladimir Shchemelev John Juanda Daniel Alaei Michael Mizrachi David Oppenheim Robert Mizrachi

2010x03 Tournament of Champions Part 1

  • 2010-08-04T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

Annie Duke Joe Hachem Erik Seidel Johnny Chan Daniel Negreanu Berry Greenstein Huckleberry Seed Jennifer Harman TJ Cloutier Howard Lederer

2010x04 Tournament of Champions Part 2

  • 2010-08-04T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

Annie Duke Joe Hachem Erik Seidel Johnny Chan Daniel Negreanu Berry Greenstein Huckleberry Seed Jennifer Harman TJ Cloutier Howard Lederer

2010x13 Main Event 10K Buy-In Part 9

  • 2010-09-08T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

Day 3 brings the field of the Main Event together for the first time with ESPN highlighting the usual suspects: Nguyen, Chan, Moneymaker, Mizrachi and Dan Harrington

2010x14 Main Event 10K Buy-In Part 10

  • 2010-09-08T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

Day 3 brings the field of the Main Event together for the first time with ESPN highlighting the usual suspects: Nguyen, Chan, Moneymaker, Mizrachi and Dan Harrington

2010x27 Main Event 10K Buy-in Part 23

  • 2010-10-27T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

The 2010 Main Event in Las Vegas. Part 23 of 27. Lon McEachern and Norman Chad call the play.

2010x28 Main Event 10K Buy-in Part 24

  • 2010-10-27T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

The 2010 Main Event in Las Vegas. Part 24 of 27. Lon McEachern and Norman Chad call the play.

2010x29 Main Event 10K Buy-in Part 25

  • 2010-11-03T01:00:00+00:00 — 60 mins

The 2010 Main Event in Las Vegas. Part 25 of 27. Lon McEachern and Norman Chad call the play.

2010x30 Main Event 10K Buy-in Part 26

  • 2010-11-03T01:00:00+00:00 — 60 mins

The 2010 Main Event final-table participants are determined in Las Vegas. Lon McEachern and Norman Chad call the play. Part 26 of 27.

2011x01 Main Event Live Day 3 Afternoon

  • Season Premiere

    2011-07-15T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

There's no event like it. A poker melting pot of pros, amateurs, and everyone in between. Here on Day 3, this marathon of Texas Hold'em is set to kick into high gear. Contenders are starting to assert themselves, ready for a sprint to the gold, bracelet, and glory. It's Day 3 of the Main Event. 1,476 players remain at the start of the afternoon session of Day 3.

2011x02 Main Event Live Day 3 Evening

  • 2011-07-15T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

The evening session of Day 3 begins with 1,149 remaining players.

2011x03 Main Event Live Day 4 Afternoon

  • 2011-07-16T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

The Main Event is about a once in a lifetime opportunity. The chance to become Champion of the World. Today is Day 4, with fewer than 700 players remaining in this afternoon session.

2011x04 Main Event Live Day 4 Evening

  • 2011-07-16T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

Here at the World Series of Poker, the bubble has burst. Welcome to the evening session of Day 4, with 562 players remaining. Tonight's all about building your stack.

2011x06 Main Event Live Day 5 Evening

  • 2011-07-17T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

Day 5 of the Main Event continues in this afternoon/evening session. 173 players remain.

2011x07 Main Event Live Day 6 Evening

  • 2011-07-18T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

The pressure of the Main Event is mounting. This long-distance poker race has crossed the halfway point. Here on Day 6, it's chip up or bust out. The evening session begins with 84 players left to follow the leader, with the average chip stack approaching 2M.

2011x08 Main Event Live Day 7 Afternoon

  • 2011-07-19T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

The time has come to separate yourself from the pack. To write yourself into poker history. To become a member of the November Nine. Just 44 players remaining with the chip average approaching 4.5M.

2011x09 Main Event Live Day 7 Evening

  • 2011-07-19T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

The evening session of Day 7 finds 32 players remaining in the Main Event.

2011x10 Main Event Live Day 8 Afternoon

  • 2011-07-20T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

The afternoon session of Day 8 starts with only 14 players remaining. After 7 and a half days, these are the only survivors from a starting field of 6,865.

2011x11 Main Event Live Day 8 Evening

  • 2011-07-20T02:00:00+01:00 — 60 mins

The gold bracelet lies at the end of the rainbow tonight. The Main Event is down to the final 12. Who will the final 9 be?

2011x25 Main Event (8)

  • no air date — 60 mins

Day 4 474 of 6,865 players remaining

2011x26 Main Event (9)

  • no air date — 60 mins

Day 5 Players remaining: 378 Average stack: 544,841 Chip leader: 2,115,000

2011x27 Main Event (10)

  • no air date — 60 mins

Day 5 Players remaining: 277 Average stack: 743,502 Chip leader: 2,487,000

2011x28 Main Event (11)

  • no air date — 60 mins

Day 5 Players remaining: 210 Chip leader: 3,716,000

2011x29 Main Event (12)

  • no air date — 60 mins

Day 5 Players remaining: 170 Average stack: 1,211,471 Chip leader: 4,213,000

2011x30 Main Event (13)

  • no air date — 60 mins

Day 6 Players remaining: 142 Average stack: 1,450,352 Chip leader: 4,706,000

2011x31 Main Event (14)

  • no air date — 60 mins

Day 6 Players remaining: 113 Average stack: 1,961,429 Chip leader: 8,686,000

2011x32 Main Event (15)

  • no air date — 60 mins

Day 6 Players remaining: 90 Average stack: 2,394,767 Chip leader: 8,655,000

2011x33 Main Event (16)

  • no air date — 60 mins

Day 6 Players remaining: 69 Average stack: 3,269,047 Chip leader: 8,995,000

2011x34 Main Event (17)

  • no air date — 60 mins

Day 7 Players remaining: 57 Average stack: 3,677,679 Chip leader: 12,865,000

2011x35 Main Event (18)

  • no air date — 60 mins

Day 7 Players remaining: 42 Average stack: 4,903,571 Chip leader: 11,995,000

2011x36 Main Event (19)

  • no air date — 60 mins

Day 7 Players remaining: 32 Average stack: 6,435,937 Chip leader: 14,680,000

2011x37 Main Event (20)

  • no air date — 60 mins

Day 7 Players remaining: 27 Average stack: 7,626,778 Chip leader: 16,005,000

2011x38 Main Event (21)

  • no air date — 60 mins

Day 8 Players remaining: 22 Average stack: 9,361,364 Chip leader: 21,045,000

2011x39 Main Event (22)

  • no air date — 60 mins

Day 8 Players remaining: 18 Average stack: 11,441,667 Chip leader: 29,775,000

2011x40 Main Event (23)

  • no air date — 60 mins

Day 8 Players remaining: 14 Average stack: 14,710,714 Chip leader: 32,820,000