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Personal Lists featuring...

Sex, Lies, and Videotape 1989

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/u/StopReadinMyUsername on reddit combined the average ratings (Critic's & Users) from IMDb, Rotten Tomatoes, Metacritic and Letterboxd, and then weighted and tweaked the results with general film data from iCheckMovies and IMDb to reveal the 1001 Greatest Movies of All Time.

source: http://redd.it/3hbiio

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1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die is a film reference book edited by Steven Jay Schneider with original essays on each film contributed by over 70 film critics.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1001_Movies_You_Must_See_Before_You_Die

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The Palme d'Or (English: Golden Palm) is the highest prize awarded at the Cannes Film Festival. It was introduced in 1955 by the organising committee. From 1939 to 1954, the highest prize was the Grand Prix du Festival International du Film.

In 1964, it was replaced again by the Grand Prix du Festival before being reintroduced in 1974 as the Palme d'Or.

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Original Edition (2003) + additions (2004-2017) in that order.
Based on http://1001films.wikia.com/wiki/The_List

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Festival de Cannes (en: Cannes Festival, also known as Cannes Film Festival) is an annual film festival held in Cannes, France, which previews new films of all genres, including documentaries, from around the world. Before 2002 it was known as Festival international du film (en: International Film Festival).

Palme d'Or (en: Golden Palm) is the highest prize awarded at Cannes. In past years the highest prize for film has been known by various names.

Year wise remarks:
* 1939–54: Highest Prize for festival was known as Grand Prix du Festival International du Film.
* 1939: The festival's debut was to take place in 1939, but it was cancelled due to World War II. Palme d'Or was awarded retrospectively in 2002 by a contemporary jury from the original selection of 1939.
* 1946: Festival debuted. Eleven films were awarded Grand Prix du Festival International du Film at the first festival.
* 1947: Highest prize was not awarded.
* 1948: Festival wasn't organised due to financial problems.
* 1950: Festival wasn't organised due to financial problems.
* 1955–63: Palme d'Or was created and replaced Grand Prix du Festival International du Film as highest prize.
* 1964–74: Grand Prix du Festival International du Film replaced Palme d'Or as highest prize.
* 1968: Festival was not held due to May 1968 events in France.
* 1975 onwards: Palme d'Or was reintroduced as highest prize replacing Grand Prix du Festival International du Film.
* In some years, two films have been awarded highest prize.

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From latest edition. 2017th edition will be published in October 2017.

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With high-profile Academy Award nominations and an increasing number of big-name actors eager to sign on to promising projects, independent films have been at the forefront in recent years like never before. But the roots of such critical and commercial successes as The Hurt Locker and Precious can be traced to the first boom of independent cinema in the 1960s, when a raft of talented filmmakers emerged to capture the attention of a rapidly growing audience of young viewers.
A thorough overview of a thriving sector of cultural production, the Directory of World Cinema: American Independent chronicles the rise of the independent sector as an outlet for directors who challenge the status quo, yet still produce accessible feature films that find wide audiences and enjoy considerable box office appeal, without sacrificing critical legitimacy. Key directors are interviewed and profiled, and a sizeable selection of films are referenced and reviewed. More than a dozen sub-genres - including African American cinema, queer cinema, documentary, familial dysfunction and exploitation - are individually considered, with an emphasis on their ability to exemplify and engage with tensions inherent in American society. Copious illustrations and a range of research resources round out the volume, making this a truly comprehensive guide.
At a time when independent films are enjoying considerable cultural cachet, this easy-to-use yet authoritative guide will find an eager audience in media historians, film studies scholars and movie buffs alike.

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The list is based on the contents of the Book, sorted by chapters:
Film of the Year: The Hurt Locker
Scoring Cinema: Mulholland Drive
African-American Cinema
The American Nightmare
Chemical World
Crime
Documentary
Exploitation USA
Familial Dysfunction
Narrative Disorder
On the Road
Queer Cinema
Rural Americana
Slackers
The Suburbs
Underground USA

More information on this is also aviable on http://worldcinemadirectory.co.uk/!

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Source: IMDB
Filter: Votes >= 10000
Order: Votes Descending
Date: 2014-08-23

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List of Nominees and Winners.

  • Actor in a Leading Role

Kenneth Branagh in "Henry V"
Tom Cruise in "Born on the Fourth of July"
Daniel Day Lewis in "My Left Foot" - WINNER
Morgan Freeman in "Driving Miss Daisy"
Robin Williams in "Dead Poets Society"

  • Actor in a Supporting Role

Danny Aiello in "Do the Right Thing"
Dan Aykroyd in "Driving Miss Daisy"
Marlon Brando in "A Dry White Season"
Martin Landau in "Crimes and Misdemeanors"
Denzel Washington in "Glory" - WINNER

  • Actress in a Leading Role

Isabelle Adjani in "Camille Claudel"
Pauline Collins in "Shirley Valentine"
Jessica Lange in "Music Box"
Michelle Pfeiffer in "The Fabulous Baker Boys"
Jessica Tandy in "Driving Miss Daisy" - WINNER

  • Actress in a Supporting Role

Brenda Fricker in "My Left Foot" - WINNER
Anjelica Huston in "Enemies, A Love Story"
Lena Olin in "Enemies, A Love Story"
Julia Roberts in "Steel Magnolias"
Dianne Wiest in "Parenthood"

  • Art Direction

"The Abyss" Art Direction: Leslie Dilley; Set Decoration: Anne Kuljian
"The Adventures of Baron Munchausen" Art Direction: Dante Ferretti; Set Decoration: Francesca Lo Schiavo
"Batman" Art Direction: Anton Furst; Set Decoration: Peter Young - WINNER
"Driving Miss Daisy" Art Direction: Bruno Rubeo; Set Decoration: Crispian Sallis
"Glory" Art Direction: Norman Garwood; Set Decoration: Garrett Lewis

  • Cinematography

"The Abyss" Mikael Salomon
"Blaze" Haskell Wexler
"Born on the Fourth of July" Robert Richardson
"The Fabulous Baker Boys" Michael Ballhaus
"Glory" Freddie Francis - WINNER

  • Costume Design

"The Adventures of Baron Munchausen" Gabriella Pescucci
"Driving Miss Daisy" Elizabeth McBride
"Harlem Nights" Joe I. Tompkins
"Henry V" Phyllis Dalton - WINNER
"Valmont" Theodor Pistek

  • Directing

"Born on the Fourth of July" Oliver Stone - WINNER
"Crimes and Misdemeanors" Woody Allen
"Dead Poets Society" Peter Weir
"Henry V" Kenneth Branagh
"My Left Foot" Jim Sheridan

  • Documentary (Feature)

"Adam Clayton Powell" Richard Killberg and Yvonne Smith, Producers
"Common Threads: Stories from the Quilt" Robert Epstein and Bill Couturié, Producers - WINNER
"Crack USA: County under Siege" Vince DiPersio and William Guttentag, Producers
"For All Mankind" Al Reinert and Betsy Broyles Breier, Producers
"Super Chief: The Life and Legacy of Earl Warren" Judith Leonard and Bill Jersey, Producers

  • Documentary (Short Subject)

"Fine Food, Fine Pastries, Open 6 to 9" David Petersen, Producer
"The Johnstown Flood" Charles Guggenheim, Producer - WINNER
"Yad Vashem: Preserving the Past to Ensure the Future" Ray Errol Fox, Producer

  • Film Editing

"The Bear" Noëlle Boisson
"Born on the Fourth of July" David Brenner, Joe Hutshing - WINNER
"Driving Miss Daisy" Mark Warner
"The Fabulous Baker Boys" William Steinkamp
"Glory" Steven Rosenblum

  • Foreign Language Film

"Camille Claudel" France
"Cinema Paradiso" Italy - WINNER
"Jesus of Montreal" Canada
"Waltzing Regitze" Denmark
"What Happened to Santiago" Puerto Rico

  • Makeup

"The Adventures of Baron Munchausen" Maggie Weston, Fabrizio Sforza
"Dad" Dick Smith, Ken Diaz, Greg Nelson
"Driving Miss Daisy" Manlio Rocchetti, Lynn Barber, Kevin Haney - WINNER

  • Music (Original Score)

"Born on the Fourth of July" John Williams
"The Fabulous Baker Boys" David Grusin
"Field of Dreams" James Horner
"Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade" John Williams
"The Little Mermaid" Alan Menken - WINNER

  • Music (Original Song)

"After All" from "Chances Are" Music by Tom Snow; Lyric by Dean Pitchford
"The Girl Who Used To Be Me" from "Shirley Valentine" Music by Marvin Hamlisch; Lyric by Alan Bergman and Marilyn Bergman
"I Love To See You Smile" from "Parenthood" Music and Lyric by Randy Newman
"Kiss the Girl" from "The Little Mermaid" Music by Alan Menken; Lyric by Howard Ashman
"Under the Sea" from "The Little Mermaid" Music by Alan Menken; Lyric by Howard Ashman - WINNER

  • Best Picture

"Born on the Fourth of July" A. Kitman Ho and Oliver Stone, Producers
"Dead Poets Society" Steven Haft, Paul Junger Witt and Tony Thomas, Producers
"Driving Miss Daisy" Richard D. Zanuck and Lili Fini Zanuck, Producers - WINNER
"Field of Dreams" Lawrence Gordon and Charles Gordon, Producers
"My Left Foot" Noel Pearson, Producer

  • Short Film (Animated)

"Balance" Christoph Lauenstein, Wolfgang Lauenstein - WINNER
"The Cow" Alexander Petrov
"The Hill Farm" Mark Baker

  • Short Film (Live Action)

"Amazon Diary" Robert Nixon
"The Childeater" Jonathan Tammuz
"Work Experience" James Hendrie - WINNER

  • Sound

"The Abyss" Don Bassman, Kevin F. Cleary, Richard Overton, Lee Orloff
"Black Rain" Donald O. Mitchell, Kevin O’Connell, Greg P. Russell, Keith A. Wester
"Born on the Fourth of July" Michael Minkler, Gregory H. Watkins, Wylie Stateman, Tod A. Maitland
"Glory" Donald O. Mitchell, Gregg C. Rudloff, Elliot Tyson, Russell Williams II - WINNER
"Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade" Ben Burtt, Gary Summers, Shawn Murphy, Tony Dawe

  • Sound Effects Editing

"Black Rain" Milton C. Burrow, William L. Manger
"Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade" Ben Burtt, Richard Hymns - WINNER
"Lethal Weapon 2" Robert Henderson, Alan Robert Murray

  • Visual Effects

"The Abyss" John Bruno, Dennis Muren, Hoyt Yeatman, Dennis Skotak - WINNER
"The Adventures of Baron Munchausen" Richard Conway, Kent Houston
"Back to the Future Part II" Ken Ralston, Michael Lantieri, John Bell, Steve Gawley

  • Writing (Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium)

"Born on the Fourth of July" Oliver Stone, Ron Kovic
"Driving Miss Daisy" Alfred Uhry - WINNER
"Enemies, A Love Story" Roger L. Simon, Paul Mazursky
"Field of Dreams" Phil Alden Robinson
"My Left Foot" Jim Sheridan, Shane Connaughton

  • Writing (Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen)

"Crimes and Misdemeanors" Woody Allen
"Dead Poets Society" Tom Schulman - WINNER
"Do the Right Thing" Spike Lee
"sex, lies, and videotape" Steven Soderbergh
"When Harry Met Sally..." Nora Ephron

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Sundance selection I have to watch. (Feature competition and World Premieres)

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This is a complete list of every movie that has ever been included in the various editions of 1001 movies. Given that I only own one edition of the physical book, this is a easier way to keep track of what has been (once) considered essential viewing.

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This list is drawn from the second edition of "The New York Times Guide to the Best 1,000 Movies Ever Made" (St. Martin's Griffin, $24.95), edited by Peter M. Nichols and published in 2004. For additional information about the list, read Peter M. Nichols's preface, or A. O. Scott's introduction.

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The Palme d'Or (English: Golden Palm) is the highest prize awarded at the Cannes Film Festival. It was introduced in 1955 by the organising committee. From 1939 to 1954, the highest prize was the Grand Prix du Festival International du Film. (Wikipedia)

Source: http://www.festival-cannes.fr/en/archives/2015/awardCompetition.html

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